Christy

The Book of Exodus Overview – Part 1 of 2 by The Bible Project

The Book the first half of the book of Exodus is the story of Moses leading Israel out of Egypt. It is the first place the words “Redemption” and “Salvation” are used in the Bible. Find out how this epic story fits into the entire Biblical Narrative.

 

 

 

 

Outline of Exodus

Exodus 1-18     Moses Leads the People out of Egypt

Exodus 19     Mount Sinai

Exodus 20-40     God’s Instructions

 

Video Transcript

0:00
Jon: Let’s talk about the book Exodus now you’re probably familiar with this book
0:04
because the epic story of Moses leading Israel out of slavery in Egypt.
0:08
Tim: Yeah, but that’s just the first half at the book.
0:10
The second half has Moses giving the Ten Commandments to Israel
0:14
along with these blueprints for making a sacred tent.
0:16
Now right here in the middle is this story that connects these two halves together
0:21
and it all takes place at the foot of a famous mountain.
0:24
Jon: OK, let’s start back at the beginning.
0:26
Tim: So the first thing we have to remember is we’re continuing this story from Genesis.
0:29
Jon: In Genesis God promised Abraham that through his family
0:33
all the nations of the earth will be blessed.
0:36
And Genesis ends with Abraham’s family down in Egypt.
0:39
When Exodus begins, four hundred years have passed, the family grows
0:43
and becomes the people group now called Israel.
0:46
Tim: But there’s this huge problem because the Israelites are enslaved to this King of the Egyptians
0:51
a guy called Pharaoh.
0:52
Jon: This guy is really bad news.
0:54
Tim: Yeah, he is horrible.
0:55
He disregards their humanity. He brutally enslaves them.
0:59
And he even orders that all of the Israelite sons should be killed
1:03
by throwing them into the Nile River. He wants to wipe these people out,
1:07
he is the worst character in the Bible so far.
1:10
Jon: Here’s where we meet an Israelite woman who wants to save her son.
1:14
Tim: And so she does throw him in the river, but safely
1:18
in this little reed basket.
1:20
Jon: And Pharaoh’s daughter finds this baby and takes him as her own.
1:24
Tim: And this is the boy who grow up to become Moses, the man who will rescue Israel from slavery.
1:30
Jon: So Moses grows up, and one day much later in his life he has this crazy encounter with God
1:36
where he comes across a bush thats on fire, but it isn’t actually burning up.
1:40
Tim: And God speaks from the bush, and he appoints Moses as the man he will use to deliver Israel.
1:45
Jon: So Moses goes to Pharaoh to tell him this news
1:50
that God wants His people free.
1:52
Tim: And Pharaoh, he just pretty much laughs at him,
1:55
“Who is this God, Yahweh?”
1:57
And, in fact he is so offended by this request he decides to make the Israelites work even harder.
2:03
Jon: So discouraged, Moses goes back to God and says, “Listen, this plan’s not gonna work.”
2:08
Tim: But God repeats His promise that He’s going to rescue them.
2:13
And in fact, it’s right here for the first time in the Bible
2:16
that we hear the word “redemption”
2:17
it literally just means ‘to purchase a slave’s freedom’
2:20
But God here uses this word to describe what He’s going to do for enslaved Israel.
2:25
Jon And God knows Pharaoh is going to resist so he sends ten different plauges
2:30
one after another… like turning water into blood…
2:33
sending all sorts pests and disease…
2:36
these plagues are really severe.
2:38
Tim: They are severe.
2:39
But what we need to understand is that the story is presenting these as
2:42
acts of divine justice against one of the worst oppressors in the story of the Bible.
2:48
And they are aimed at the purpose of rescuing these enslaved people and defeating the God’s of Egypt.
2:54
Jon: This all comes to a climax at the tenth plague…
2:56
where God is going to kill the first-born sons across all Egypt, every house, it is pretty rough.
3:02
Tim: It is. But is also God’s response for how Pharaoh killed the Israelite sons.
3:07
Jon: Now as you turn the page, you suddenly get two long chapters of detailed instructions
3:12
for what’s essentially throwing a dinner party with a recipe for lamb…?
3:16
Tim: Yeah, but this lamb is super important.
3:19
God tells the Israelites to pick it out and to prepare it to be eaten.
3:23
And they are supposed to take its blood and then paint it all over the door frame of their house.
3:28
And anyone who is in that house will be spared from this final plague.
3:33
And so this meal, which is called “Passover”,
3:36
it commemorates this key moment in the story where God brings his justice on human evil,
3:41
but also shows mercy by providing this substitute.
3:46
Jon: This final plauge makes Pharaoh angry, and he demands that Israel get out of Egypt, which is great!
3:51
But suddenly, as they leave, Pharaoh changes his mind- he has “a change of heart.”
3:56
Tim: But on top of that, we are also told that “God hardens Pharaoh’s heart.”
4:00
Jon: Why would God do that?
4:02
Tim: Well, what we need to remember is that over and over in the story Pharaoh has already chosen to harden his own heart…
4:08
so at this point, Pharaoh, he’s not just evil, he’s become monstrously evil.
4:12
Even his own advisers think that he has gone way too far.
4:15
And so how was God supposed to deal with such an extreme form of evil?
4:19
And what we see in the story is that God uses his power
4:23
to lure evil into its own destruction.
4:26
Jon: Pharaoh and his army are destroyed in the Red Sea as Israel passes into freedom.
4:30
Tim: And after this we find the very first song of worship in the Bible
4:34
as people praise God for redeeming them.
4:37
And it is in this story that the word salvation is also used for the first time,
4:42
which means simply, ‘to be rescued from danger’.
4:44
Jon: Now that they’re saved, you would think think that everything should be great…
4:47
…but the story quickly turns.
4:50
The Israelites start wandering in the desert. They are tired, hungry, lost.
4:54
and you start to wonder what’s God doing? What are they saved for?
4:58
Tim: And we learn the answer to that question in the very next story
5:02
which ties the two parts at this whole book together.
Christy

The Book of Genesis Overview – Part 2 of 2 by The Bible Project

God makes a promise to a man named Abram that all nations of the earth will be blessed through his family. The second half of the book of Genesis follows this man’s family for four generations.

Discover the thread that God wove through each generation of this family (hint: a promise). It’s all explained in this illustrated video by The Bible Project.

 

 

 

 

Video Transcript

0:02
Jon: We’re walking through the book of Genesis which is made up of these two main parts.
0:06
Tim: In the first part begins in the Garden where we watched humanity spiral
0:10
downward in self-destruction and it ends in the Tower of Babel where
0:14
a rebellious humanity is scattered by God.
0:16
Jon: Then the second part Genesis zooms in and focuses on just one family
0:21
Tim: And right in the middle is this story that links the two parts of Genesis
0:25
together and helps us
0:27
understand what the whole book is all about.
0:30
Jon: So how do we get from the Tower of Babel to the story here in the middle?
0:34
Tim: Well after the scattering at Babel there’s this genealogy
0:37
and it follows one of the tribes all the way down to this one guy named Abram.
0:42
Jon: You probably know him as Abraham.
0:45
Tim: And God starts making all these promises to Abraham
0:47
like He’s going to bless him and give him a ton of kids and He says that
0:51
through him and his family all the nations of the earth are now going to find God’s blessing.
0:57
Basically God is trying to restore humanity back to the goodness of the Garden
1:02
into His original intentions for the world. So it’s like His rescue plan for humanity.
1:07
That’s why the whole second half of Genesis is about this one family.
1:12
And so you have Abraham
1:14
and then he has a son Isaac who has Jacob and then Jacob has twelve sons.
1:19
And to each generation God renews His promise
1:22
to bless them and all nations through them
1:25
Jon: So because of this promise to use this family to rescue the world
1:29
it’s pretty easy to read these stories as examples of how to be a good person.
1:34
Tim: But actually, for the most part, this family is totally dysfunctional.
1:38
So, for example, let’s go back to Abraham.
1:41
This whole story is about God giving him and his wife Sarah a family.
1:45
But two different times he basically gives Sarah away
1:50
to other men by denying that she’s even his wife.
1:53
And then Sarah gets impatient about having a son so she makes
1:56
Abraham sleep with her serving girl which then causes all of these other problems in the family.
2:02
Jon: So they get really old
2:04
and you begin to think that there’s no way they’re going to have a kid of their own.
2:07
But then, miraculously, they do. It’s Isaac.
2:10
Tim: And Isaac he has two sons: Esau and Jacob
2:14
and it seems like things are going pretty good.
2:16
Jon: But, Jacob, the younger brother wants the family’s inheritance,
2:20
which belongs to Esau the older brother,
2:21
so he devises a plan where he’s gonna steal it from his father Isaac who
2:26
at this point the story is now old and blind.
2:29
Tim: Which who does that? It’s horrible stealing from your blind father.
2:33
Jon: Yeah and then he just takes off.
2:35
Tim: So Jacob goes on from there to have twelve sons, a big family.
2:39
But, Jacob loves his eleventh son, Joseph
2:43
way more than all the others and so he gives him this special technicolor
2:46
dream-coat and his brothers, because of this, come to hate him.
2:50
Jon: So much so that they plan on killing him.
2:53
Tim: But they don’t. They, instead, just sell them as a slave down in Egypt.
2:58
Jon: Now, while in Egypt, through this crazy series of events,
3:02
Joseph goes from being in a prison cell to becoming the second in command there.
3:06
Tim: And so later on that the whole Middle East falls into this food shortage
3:10
and Joseph’s brothers they come down to Egypt looking for food.
3:14
And then, when they get there, who should they find as the ruler of the whole land?
3:19
Jon: It’s Joseph, that guy they sold into slavery.
3:23
But, he actually saves them from starving to death
3:26
Tim: And so here you have it: these are the great grandchildren of
3:30
Abraham who have done this heinous act to their brother
3:33
but God has transformed to their evil into something good.
3:37
Jon: And that’s exactly what Joseph says here in the last paragraph of the entire book.
3:41
He says, “You guys planned all this for evil
3:44
but God planned it for good to save people’s lives.”
3:48
Tim: Now these words they conclude the book because they
3:51
actually summarize the message of the whole story so far.
3:54
Humans keep choosing evil and we are thinking they’re
3:58
screwing up God’s plan but He keeps turning their evil back into good
4:02
and somehow He’s going to use
4:05
this family to restore humanity back to the Garden.
4:09
Jon: So that’s the book of Genesis but we still don’t know
4:14
how exactly He’s going to use this family to bring us back to the Garden.
4:17
Tim: Well yeah, but this is just the first book so that’s what the rest of the Bible
4:21
sets out to answer.
4:23
Hey there, I’m Tim
4:24
and this is Jon.
4:25
We believe the best way to understand the Bible is to get a handle
4:28
on its overall storyline
4:30
as well as the individual design of every book.
4:33
If you’re wondering where we make all these videos we make them in Portland, Oregon
4:37
we actually share some space with the creative agency called Sincerely Truman
4:41
who serves coffee, free coffee, every morning so look us up and come by and have a cup.
4:46
We’re a nonprofit so if you find these videos valuable we would love your support.
4:50
Go to jointhebibleproject.com you can download full resolution
4:54
versions of the video you could download study guides for each video
4:57
its all for free at jointhebibleproject.com
Christy

The Image of God

Have you ever wondered why God made you? Have you thought about your purpose in life? We all have.

Our sense of value comes from the fact that we are created in the image of God. But what does it mean to be an image of God?

The guys at The Bible Project created this animated walkthrough of “The Image of God.”

 

 

 

Video Transcript

0:02
So if you lived in ancient bible times odds are you lived under the authority of a king
0:07
And many of these kings claimed that they were Gods and they would even call themselves the Image of God
0:13
Meaning they had authority to tell people what to do order things to be made
0:17
Yah, they got to define good and evil
0:20
And these kings would often make statues of themselves which in hebrew were called Tselem often translated as idol or image
0:27
But for Israel they didn’t view their kings as the God. In fact they were never supposed to even make images of God.
0:36
It’s exactly right and that was really unique for that time and culture.
0:41
This is rooted first of all in Israel’s belief that you can´t reduce the creator God down to any one thing in creation.
0:48
But there is another reason. PEOPLE AREN’T TO MAKE IMAGE OF GOD BECAUSE GOD HAS ALREADY MADE IMAGE OF HIMSELF.
0:56
When did he do that
0:58
Lets go to page 1 of the bible and the first person we meet there is God.
1:03
He is the one with authority over all creation. He speaks and the creation obeys and He defines what is good and not good
1:10
In other words, He alone is King but then surprisingly as the pinnacle of all of God’s creative work He makes humans.
1:16
and he calls all of them the Image of God
1:21
So he gives all humans the authority to rule
1:22
Exactly. That is what He goes on to say.
1:25
He tells the humans to subdue the earth and to rule it. And so this task,
1:29
that once belonged only to elite kings is here in the bible, the task of every human being
1:36
This was a revolutionary statement in its day because all humans are being called
1:39
to rule and to participate in the human project.
1:42
So what does this mean, I mean, how are we all supposed to rule.
1:45
So, the picture we get in Genesis is
1:47
gardening, “Gardening?!”
1:48
Yes, Gardening. So, they rule the earth
1:51
by cultivating it, by harnessing all of the earth’s raw potential and then making something more and new out of it
1:58
So, growing food for each other.
2:00
Yes, but that also includes growing families which then becomes neighborhoods
2:05
and then they create communities where people are going to work and take care of each other
2:08
and build businesses and cities and will expand to new places and so on
2:12
So, ruling is really the day to day acts of our work and creativity
2:16
Yes, we take the world somewhere
2:20
This is humanity’s divine and sacred task.
2:23
This all sounds really nice
2:24
And humans have designed some pretty great things
2:28
But just as often we create things that cause a lot of sufferring and a lot of injustice
2:34
So, maybe we shouldn’t actually be ruling
2:37
Yah, so the bible addresses this
2:39
In Genesis, what happens is that God gives humans
2:43
a choice of how they are going to rule.
2:45
So, are they going to use their authority for the benefit of others
2:48
which is God’s definition of good
2:49
Or are they going to turn away and define good and evil for themselves
2:55
and use their authority for self advantage
2:56
and in the story they choose to define good and evil on their own terms
3:01
And so this is the bible’s depiction of the human condition
3:04
so sometimes we pull off amazingly good stuff but just as often
3:10
despite our best intentions we act selfishly and we create evil in the world
3:15
and so we are stuck as mediocre rulers
3:17
making a mess of things
3:19
But that’s not the end of the story
3:21
so, the bible goes on and makes this claim
3:23
that all of this was resolved when God bound himself
3:26
to humanity through Jesus and
3:29
He showed us what it looks like to truly rule as a human
3:33
So what does it look like
3:35
Well, Jesus ruled by serving and by seeking
3:38
the best for others by putting himself underneath them
3:41
and loving not just His friends but also His enemies
3:44
And that’s not a typical way to rule
3:47
And not only that Jesus confronted the consequences of
3:50
all the evil and death that we have created by
3:53
our messed up ways of ruling
3:55
and he takes it, I mean he lets it kill Him
3:58
And so, when the new testament writers looked back
4:01
to Jesus’s resurrection they see
4:04
a whole new future opening up for all humanity
4:07
Jesus is a new way to be human
4:10
Yah, that’s why they call Jesus the Image of God or New Human
4:14
And not only that they also believe that Jesus is divine
4:19
life and power is now available to
4:21
heal and transform us to become our life and power
4:24
and this sounds really nice
4:26
but what does it really look like
4:28
So, practically the apostle Paul said it looks
4:30
like people being filled by Jesus’s own presence and spirit
4:33
filled with love and joy and peace and patience
4:38
and kindness and goodness and integrity and gentleness and self control
4:42
He says this is the new humanity that God wants
4:45
to create in us. So that we become people
4:49
in whom God’s image is being restored
4:51
people who will move the human project forward
4:53
and that’s actually how the story of the bible ends
4:55
It’s a renewed world where God is on
4:58
His throne and His servants are all around Him
5:00
But they are the ones ruling over this new world
5:03
Taking it into new uncharted territory with Jesus
5:07
as their healer and their God.
5:15
Thanks for watching this channel
5:17
We do this because we believe the bible is
5:19
one unified narrative that leads to Jesus
5:21
It has profound wisdom for the modern world
5:23
So we are making different video
5:26
series some that walk people through the
5:28
design and message of books of the bible
5:30
or whole sections of the bible
5:31
We also do a series that take one biblical
5:33
theme and trace that through the whole narrative
5:35
arch of the bible kinda like the one
5:37
you just watched and we have a lot more
5:39
series coming up that we have planned
5:41
The Bible project is possible because of
5:43
your support, so if some people give one time
5:47
gifts and there is a growing number of monthly supporters
5:51
as well and we are all behind this.
5:53
we want to make these videos free and available
5:55
to anyone anywhere.
5:57
Yah, you can join us and be a part of this
5:59
Go to jointhebibleproject.com. You can give there.
6:01
There is also downloadable stuff like full res videos
6:06
study guides, posters. It’s all for free and
6:09
its all because of your guy’s support
6:11
so thanks a lot, thank you guys.
Christy

The Book of Genesis Overview – Part 1 of 2 by The Bible Project

The Book of Genesis can be broken up in two parts. The first part, chapters 1-11, trace the story of God and the whole world from creation all the way to the tower of Babel.

Enjoy this animated explanation of Genesis created by the team at The Bible Project.

 

 

 

 

Video Transcript

0:02
>> Jon: The first book of the Bible is a book you have probably heard of, it’s called Genesis.
0:06
>> Tim: Genesis comes from a Hebrew word, it’s pronounced rasheet.
0:11
It just means beginning.
0:12
>> Jon: Now there’s a lot of stories from the book of Genesis,
0:14
and it’s easy to just pull out a specific story
0:17
and try to tell you what it might mean. But we think the best way to understand this
0:22
book, is to look at the book as a whole
0:25
and show you how the whole thing is designed.
0:28
>> Tim: The book is designed to fall into two main parts.
0:33
You have chapters 1-11, which is telling the story of God and the whole world
0:37
and then you have the second part which is about God and Abraham’s family
0:41
as chapters 12-50, and how the two of those parts relate,
0:45
that’s where you find the message of the book.
0:47
>> Jon: OK, so lets start back at the beginning. The first part of Genesis begins with the
0:52
creation story where God creates everything
0:55
>> Tim: And how exactly that happens of course that’s where all the debates come. But,
0:59
He takes a dark watery chaos and He turns it into a beautiful garden where humans can
1:05
flourish.
1:06
>> Jon: That sounds nice.
1:07
>> Tim: That does sound nice. In fact seven different times God says of all that He’s
1:13
made that it’s good
1:14
>> Jon: And this is where we meet the first human characters in the Bible, Adam and Eve.
1:19
>> Tim: They’re both individual characters but also representative. Adam is the Hebrew
1:23
word for humanity and Eve is the Hebrew word for life and God creates them in his image,
1:30
in other words, Humanity reflects or is meant to reflect the creativity, the goodness, and
1:36
character of the creator out into the world that He’s made. And they’re supposed to reproduce,
1:41
and make cultures, and neighborhoods, and art, and gardens, and everything else. But,
1:46
He gives them a moral choice about how they are going to build this world. And this is
1:53
what the tree of the “Knowledge of Good and Evil” is all about.
1:55
>> Jon: And He tells them, “don’t eat of this tree or you will die.” What’s that
2:02
all about?
2:02
>> Tim: Up till now God has been defining and providing what is good.  And so God is
2:09
the one with the knowledge of good and evil.  But this tree represents a choice:  will
2:15
the human’s trust God’s definition of good and evil, or are they going to seize
2:20
the opportunity to try and define good and evil for themselves.
2:23
>> Jon: And Adam and Eve eat the fruit.
2:26
>> Tim: This is the core, biblical explanation for that concept of sin, that desire to call
2:33
the shots myself its the inward turn of the human heart to do what’s good for me and
2:39
my tribe even if it’s at the expense of you and your tribe.
2:43
>> Jon: And the problem is humans are horrible at defining good and evil without God and
2:48
so now that Humanity’s made this choice, things get really…
2:52
>> Tim: …really bad. So Genesis 3 through 11 is like tracing this downward spiral of
3:00
all Humanity. So adam and eve, they can’t trust each other anymore. and so theres a
3:04
little story about how they were naked and felt fine about it beforehand, but now they
3:08
feel shameful because all the sudden Adam’s definition of good and evil might be different
3:13
than Eve’s. And so they hide from each other.
3:15
>> Jon: And there’s another story of temptation. Cain is jealous of his brother Abel, and he
3:20
gives in and kills him.
3:22
>> Tim: there’s a story right after Cain about a guy named Lamech. All we know about
3:26
Lamech is that he accumulates wives like property and he sings songs about he’s a more violent
3:33
vengeful person than Cain ever was and he’s proud of it.
3:36
>> Jon: Things get so bad with the human race, that we see God decide to just wipe us out.
3:43
>> Tim: Yeah, we typically think of the flood story as about God being angry, but it actually
3:48
begins with God’s sadness and grief about the state of his world. So out of the passion
3:54
to preserve the goodness of his world, He washes it clean with the flood.
3:59
>> Jon: But there’s a glimmer of hope. He chooses Noah and his whole family and saves
4:04
them on this boat.
4:06
>> Tim: Don’t forget about the animals
4:08
>> Jon: Right. And the animals. So Noah and his family are going to reboot all of Humanity.
4:14
He must be a pretty great guy.
4:16
>> Tim: But this is the story most people don’t know because it’s kind of weird.
4:20
Noah gets off the boat, and plants a vineyard, and gets totally plastered, and then something
4:26
sketchy happens in his tent with his son. It’s a tragic story.
4:30
>> Jon: So from here, Humanity grows again and things are as bad as before.  And the
4:35
last story is the famous story of the Tower of Babel.
4:39
>> Tim: In this story you have all of the nations uniting together to use this new technology
4:44
they have: the brick. They want to make a name for themselves, build a big city with
4:49
this huge tower that will reach up to the gods. But God knows that this city will be
4:56
a nightmare, so in His mercy, He scatters them. All of these stories underline the same
5:03
basic idea: when humans seize autonomy from God and define good for themselves, it results
5:10
in a world of tragedy, and death.
5:12
>> Jon: And all of this leaves you wondering, is there any hope for humanity.
5:16
>> Tim: Yes, yeah there is. It’s the very next story that answers that question; it’s
5:21
the beginning of God’s mission to rescue and restore his world.
Christy

The Gospel of Mark Explained with Illustrations by The Bible Project

Charts and images help us quickly comprehend concepts. That’s why before you read the Gospel of Mark, I recommend you watch this brief video produced by The Bible Project. As the narrator explains the Gospel of Mark chapter by chapter, the scenes are illustrated on a chart demonstrating the structure and flow of the text. It’s fascinating to watch the drawings in progress before your eyes. The video does an excellent job of showing how the individual events work together to form a larger narrative about Jesus. Enjoy!

 

 

 

 

Download a Free Digital Copy of the Poster from the Video

These illustrated charts are so helpful, I encourage you to download a copy for personal study. It’s free! Courtesy of The Bible Project.

[button link=”https://thebibleproject.com/product/mark-poster/” color=”purple” newwindow=”yes”] Mark Poster[/button]

 

Video Transcript

0:03
The gospel according to Mark:
0:05
it’s one of the first accounts of the life of Jesus
0:07
and our earliest historical traditions link this book to a Christian scribe
0:11
named Mark, or John Mark.
0:13
He was co-worker with Paul and close partner with Peter.
0:16
And in fact an ancient church historian named Papias he recalls
0:21
that Mark had collected all of the eyewitness accounts and memories of Peter
0:25
and then shape them in this account.
0:27
But Mark didn’t just randomly throw the pieces together
0:30
he’s carefully designed the story of Jesus.
0:33
In the first line of the book Mark makes this claim about Jesus:
0:36
“it’s the beginning of the good news about Jesus the Messiah the Son of God.”
0:42
And it’s interesting is that this is the only time
0:44
Mark is going to tell you what he thinks.
0:46
For the rest of the book is going to influence you
0:48
by simply putting Jesus’ actions and words in front of you
0:52
and showing you how other people react to Him.
0:55
Now Mark design the story of Jesus as a drama with three acts:
0:58
the first one set in Galilee, the third one is set in Jerusalem
1:02
and the second act shows Jesus on the way from one place to the other.
1:06
In each of the acts he focuses on repeated theme
1:09
so in act 1 everybody’s blown away by Jesus and they’re wondering who is this Jesus
1:14
In act 2 it’s the disciples who are struggling to understand
1:18
what it means for Jesus to be the Messiah.
1:20
And then in act 3 we watch the surprising paradox of how Jesus becomes the Messianic King.
1:26
Let’s just dive in and you’ll see how it unfolds.
1:28
After the opening line Mark begin with a quotation from the ancient prophets
1:32
Isaiah and Malachi who said that God would send messengers Israel
1:36
to prepare them for when God would show up himself to rescue His people
1:40
and become their King.
1:41
And Mark introduces John the Baptist as the messenger
1:45
and then right when you expect God to show it personally Mark introduces Jesus.
1:50
And as He comes onto the scene heavens open, God’s Spirit descends on Jesus
1:54
and God says: “You are my beloved Son.”
1:57
After this Mark places in front of us a summary of Jesus’ core message.
2:01
He went about Galilee announcing the good news that God’s kingdom has come near.
2:06
Jesus is carrying forward the story from the Old Testament scriptures
2:09
about God’s rescue operation for His world
2:12
Through Jesus God is restoring His reign over the world
2:16
by confronting and defeating evil and its hold on people’s lives.
2:20
And them by inviting them to live under His reign by following Jesus
2:25
From here Mark given us a big block of stories
2:27
showing us Jesus power as He brings God’s kingdom.
2:31
he goes about healing people whose bodies are sick
2:34
or broken or under the oppression of dark spiritual powers.
2:38
And Jesus even does something that for Jewish people only God has the right to do:
2:42
he forgives people sins.
2:44
And Jesus actions here produce lots of different responses:
2:47
so some people follow Him and become His disciples,
2:50
other people don’t know what to think and still others reject Him completely,
2:54
especially Israel’s leaders who accuse Him of blaspheming God
2:58
and being powered by evil.
3:00
But Jesus isn’t surprised by these responses, in fact He draws attention to it.
3:05
In chapter 4 Mark has collected many of Jesus parables
3:08
about the hidden mysterious nature of God’s kingdom.
3:12
Jesus says that His message is like seed falling on different types of soil:
3:16
some receptive some not; or it’s like a mustard seed that’s very tiny
3:21
it seems insignificant but then it grows huge and surprises everyone.
3:26
Jesus’ point is that He really is the Messiah bringing God’s kingdom,
3:31
but it doesn’t look like what anybody expected.
3:34
This growing confusion about Jesus among the crowds is connected to a key idea
3:39
Mark emphasizes at the end of Act 1
3:41
that even among Jesus disciples there’s confusion
3:44
even they’re struggling to grasp who Jesus really is
3:47
and that brings us to act 2.
3:49
It begins with a crucial conversation:
3:51
Jesus takes the disciples aside and He asks: “who do you all say that I Am?”
3:55
And Peter speaks up saying: “You are The Messiah,”
3:58
but it becomes clear that for Peter this means
4:01
that Jesus is a victorious military King from the line of David
4:05
will rescue Israel from the Romans,
4:07
but for Jesus to be the Messiah means that he is the suffering servant King
4:12
of Isaiah 53 who will bring God’s rule by giving up His life in Jerusalem.
4:18
An the disciples they don’t get it
4:20
they think following King Jesus is going to mean fame and status and importance.
4:24
And Jesus makes it clear that far following Him is actually like dying,
4:28
like carrying your own cross.
4:30
It means rejecting violence and pride and selfishness
4:34
and giving one’s life out for others and acts of service and love.
4:37
He has the same conversation with them two more times
4:41
and it all culminates in Jesus’ important statement
4:44
that the Son of man did not come to be served, but to become a servant
4:48
and give His life as a ransom for many.
4:50
The disciples still don’t get it they respond confusion and fear.
4:55
And so here in act 2 Mark has placed another key story that echoes the books introduction.
5:00
Jesus takes three of His disciples up to a mountain
5:03
and He suddenly transformed is radiating with light and glory
5:07
and a cloud envelops them.
5:08
Now this is just like the glory of the God of Israel
5:11
that showed up long ago on Mount Sinai.
5:14
And then the two prophets who stood in God’s presence on Mount Sinai,
5:18
Mosses and Elijah they appear next to Jesus as God announces again:
5:22
“This is my beloved Son.”
5:24
Now by placing this story in the middle of all these conversations in act 2
5:29
Mark is making an astounding claim
5:31
that Jesus God’s Son is the physical embodiment of God’s own glory.
5:37
And Jesus the glorious God of Israel is going to become King
5:41
by suffering and dying for the sins of His own people.
5:45
It’s a puzzling claim that confuses and scares the disciples
5:49
as they leave the mountain which brings us to act 3.
5:52
Jesus makes a very public royal entry into Jerusalem for Passover.
5:56
People are hailing Him as the Messiah
5:58
then He enters into the temple courtyard and He asserts His royal authority
6:02
by running out the thieves and crooks and stopping the sacrificial system.
6:07
Then this kicks off a whole week of Jesus debating
6:09
and confronting the leaders of Israel condemning their hypocrisy
6:13
and so they set in motion a plan to have him killed.
6:16
And Jesus warn His disciples predicting that Jerusalem
6:19
and it’s temple will be destroyed within a generation
6:22
and His disciples will be persecuted just like Him
6:26
until He return one day to bring God’s kingdom fully over the world
6:30
And it all leads up to the final night
6:32
Jesus has His last Passover meal with the disciples,
6:35
a symbolic meal, that told the story of Israel’s liberation from slavery
6:40
through the death of the Passover lamb.
6:42
And Jesus takes these symbols and gives the new meaning:
6:45
they point to the liberation from sin and death
6:48
that will happen through the death of the suffering servant Messiah
6:52
From here the story rushes forward to Jesus arrest
6:54
His trial before Israel’s priest in the Roman governor Pilate
6:58
all resulting in Jesus’ crucifixion.
7:01
And culminates in a key scene that matches the important scenes from acts 1 and 2.
7:06
Except this time it’s darkness that descends not a cloud
7:10
and instead of the divine voice from heaven it’s Jeusus’ crying out before He dies.
7:17
And then most surprising is that it’s a Roman soldier who sees Jesus died
7:21
who grasps and then announces who Jesus is:
7:25
“this man was the Son of God.”
7:27
He’s the first person in the story
7:29
to recognize the story shocking claim about Jesus’ identity
7:34
that it’s the crucified Son of God who is the Messiah, Jesus of Nazareth,
7:38
who died for His friend and for His enemies.
7:42
After this Jesus’ body is placed in a tomb
7:45
and on the first day of the new week two women from His disciples come to the tomb
7:50
and they discover that the tomb is empty, the stone is rolled away
7:53
And then angelic man informs them that Jesus isn’t here
7:57
that he’s risen from the death.
7:59
And so he orders them to go and tell this good news to the others disciples
8:02
that Jesus is alive that he’ll meet them back up in Galilee.
8:06
And the women they’re freaked out;
8:08
Mark say that they fled from from the tomb in terror,
8:11
telling no one, for they were afraid.
8:13
And that’s how the book ends:
8:15
with Jesus disciples showing the same kind of fear and confusion
8:18
that concluded acts 2 and 1.
8:21
Now if you look at your Bible you’ll see
8:23
that the gospel of Mark has more to its ending
8:26
where Jesus appears, He speaks to His disciples
8:28
but there’s also a note here telling you that ending is not part of the original book
8:33
that it’s only found in later less reliable manuscripts.
8:36
Now it’s possible that the original ending got lost
8:39
or that Mark actually never finished his account,
8:41
but it’s more likely that this abrupt ending is intentional
8:45
to make a point the entire story has focused on the shocking claim
8:49
the puzzle Jesus disciples from beginning to end;
8:52
that is the suffering, crucified and risen Jesus was the Messiah, the Son of God
8:58
that God’s love and upside-down kingdom were revealed
9:02
as Jesus died for the sins of the world.
9:05
And so the story ends without closure and it forces you, the reader,
9:09
to grapple with this very strange and scandalous claim about Jesus.
9:13
And are you gonna run away like the disciples,
9:15
or you going to recognize Jesus as your King and going tell the good news?
9:20
And only you can answer that question.
9:23
And that’s what the gospel of Mark is all about.

 

Christy

An Animated Explanation of the Gospel According to Mark by The Bible Project

Jesus wasn’t the kind of Messiah (Savior) the people were expecting. They anticipated a political king who would overthrow the Romans and restore Israel as an independent nation. That wasn’t the kind of king Jesus came to be. This raises some questions that needed to be answered so Mark (or John Mark) set out to write a biography of Jesus to explain these things.

The Gospel of Mark answers these questions about the identity and purpose of Jesus, the Messiah predicted by the Old Testament prophets. The video by The Bible Project explains this outline of Mark in more detail.

 

Mark’s Outline

Mark 1-8  Who is Jesus?

Mark 8:27 – 10  Who do you say I am?

Mark 11-16  How did Jesus become the Messianic King?

 

 

 

You might also be interested in a video by The Bible Project: Animated Explanation of the Messiah.

 

 

Video Transcript

0:00
The Gospel of Mark is a book in the Bible about the life of Jesus and the
0:04
earliest reliable tradition tells us was written by a guy named John Mark.
0:08
Now, Mark didn’t just grab a bunch of random stories about Jesus and throw them together.
0:12
He’s designed this book to address some really specific questions about whether or not Jesus was the Jewish Messiah.
0:18
So let’s stop right there, because that’s a term a lot of people like me are not familiar with.
0:24
The Messiah was a royal figure, sometimes called ‘the son of god’,
0:28
that Israel was expecting to come and set up a Kingdom here on earth.
0:33
Around the time of Jesus, Israel was occupied by Rome
0:36
and so many Jews were hoping that the Messiah would come and overthrow the Romans and rule as King.
0:42
But Jesus didn’t overthrow the Romans, in fact, he was killed by them.
0:46
And that brings us to the very issues Mark is trying to get at in his book.
0:51
So in the first half, he focuses on WHO Jesus is, ‘is he really the messiah?’
0:56
And then in the second half he’s addressing HOW Jesus became the Messianic king
1:01
and right here in the middle of the book is this pivotal story that brings the two halves together,
1:06
and Jesus answers both of these questions.
1:09
So lets talk about the first half of the book – Who Jesus is
1:13
So Mark, makes his beliefs about Jesus very clear from the first line of the book:
1:17
“the beginning of the good news about Jesus, the messiah, the son of God”.
1:21
One of the next stories is Jesus getting baptized,
1:24
and God’s voice announces from heaven: “This is my Son”.
1:28
So it couldn’t really be more clear, they’re presenting Jesus as the Messiah.
1:31
Yes, but, as you’re reading through the first half of Mark, you’ll notice something really interesting start to happen.
1:37
Jesus is healing all these different people, and constantly telling them to keep quiet about who he is.
1:44
This happens so many times in Mark’s account, it’s very strange.
1:48
Yeah, why keep it a secret?
1:50
Remember, lots of Jews had lots of different expectations about what the messiah would be and do,
1:56
so Jesus doesn’t want people to misunderstand what it means for him to be the Messiah.
2:02
So, with that in mind, we now get to the pivotal story at the center of the book
2:06
where Jesus takes his disciples away and asks, “Who do you all say that I am.”
2:10
And Peter says what everyone has been saying “your are the Messiah, the Son of God.”
2:15
But then something new happens, Jesus starts explaining to them How he’s going to become the messianic King,
2:21
and it’s not what they expected:
2:23
he says he’s going to ‘suffer and die’ and rule by being a servant, or in his words,
2:29
The Son of Man didn’t come to be served but to become a servant and give his life as a ransom for many.”
2:35
Peter’s so startled by this he rebukes Jesus because there is no way he is going to let Jesus die.
2:41
And Jesus responds, Get behind me Satan. Which is really intense.
2:47
It really is, but it highlights how important it for Jesus that his disciples come to understand who he really is;
2:54
so in this pivotal section, Jesus tries 3x to have this conversation with them, and each they respond in confusion, and even fear.
2:59
and each they respond in confusion, and even fear.
3:03
OK, so this launches us into the second half of the book where Mark addresses the question of how Jesus becomes the messianic king.
3:10
this is the last week of Jesus’ life, where Jesus goes to to Jerusalem,
3:14
gets into conflict with the religious leaders and gets arrested…
3:17
He’s put on trial as someone claiming to be king of the Jews.
3:21
He’s even given a crown and purple robe, like a king would get, but it’s all a cruel joke,
3:28
then he is mocked and beaten and hung on the cross where he dies.
3:32
And at this crucial scene there is a new character
3:36
A Roman Soldier
3:36
who suddenly gets everything that is going on…
3:39
he says “surely this is the Son of God”
3:41
which is crazy, it’s an enemy who’s first putting it all together, that Israel’s messianic king is the crucified Jesus.
3:50
That is the structure of the book of Mark, but the book doesn’t end with Jesus dead on the cross.
3:56
No, on the 3rd day some women go to visit Jesus’ tomb,
3:59
only to find that the it’s empty and there’s this angel standing there instructing them
4:04
“go and tell” this good news that Jesus is alive from the dead.
4:09
But instead they run away, and don’t tell anyone because they are afraid… And that is how the book ends.
4:15
Which is a really abrupt ending.
4:17
Yeah, so abrupt that later scribes did add an ending that brings more closure to the story,
4:23
you’ll find that story in your bible with a footnote that it was added much later.
4:28
But Mark’s a brilliant storyteller, and he intentionally ended the book abruptly,
4:32
All through the book the disciples have been confused about Jesus’ plan to give up his life,
4:37
the story in the middle and now here at the end.
4:40
it’s like Mark is acknowledging just how startling this claim really is.
4:44
and he wants you the reader to wrestle with it for yourself:
4:47
is the crucified Jesus really the Messiah they have been waiting for?

Christy

The Book of Ecclesiastes Explained with Illustrations by The Bible Project

Charts and images help us quickly comprehend concepts. That’s why I recommend you watch this brief video produced by The Bible Project. As the narrator explains the ideas, you can watch illustrations take shape on a chart demonstrating the structure and flow of the text. It’s fascinating to watch the drawings in progress before your eyes. Enjoy!

 

 

 

 

Download a Free Digital Copy of the Poster from the Video

These illustrated charts are so helpful, I encourage you to download a copy for personal study. It’s free! Courtesy of The Bible Project.

[button link=”https://thebibleproject.com/product/ecclesiastes-poster/” color=”purple” newwindow=”yes”] Ecclesiastes Poster[/button]

 

Video Transcript

0:03
The book of Ecclesiastes. It’s part of the Bible’s wisdom literature
0:06
and it opens with this line:
0:08
The words of “Qohelet”, the son of David, king in Jerusalem
0:13
Now in Hebrew the word “Qohelet” means someone who has gathered people together
0:17
and in this case it’s to learn so it’s often translated in english as teacher
0:22
and the teacher said to be a son or a descendant of King David
0:26
and so there are different views about who this figure might have been
0:29
Many think that it refers to King Solomon
0:31
Others to maybe one of the later kings of David’s line
0:35
and still others think that it’s actually a later Israelite teacher
0:39
who has adopted a Solomon like persona as a teaching aid
0:43
whichever of these uses correct the key thing is to recognize that the teacher is a character in the book
0:49
and is different than the author of the book who remains anonymous
0:53
so we do here the teachers voice for most of the book but it’s actually a different voice, the author
1:00
who introduces us to the teacher in the first sentence
1:02
and then at the end concludes the book by summarizing and evaluating everything the teacher just said
1:09
so the author is someone who wants us to hear all that the teacher has to say and
1:13
then help us process it and form our own conclusion
1:16
so what does the teacher have to say
1:18
Well the author summarizes the teacher’s basic message at the beginning and right at the end
1:23
and it’s “Hevel”, “Hevel”, Everything is utterly “Hevel”
1:28
Now most English Bibles translate this word “Hevel” as meaningless
1:33
but that doesn’t quite capture the heart of the idea
1:36
In Hebrew, “Hevel” literally means vapor or smoke
1:39
and the teacher uses this word 38 times in the book as a metaphor
1:44
to describe how life is first of all temporary or fleeting like a wisp of smoke
1:49
but secondly also how life is an enigma or a paradox
1:54
Like smoke, it appears solid but when you try and grab onto it there’s nothing there
2:01
So there’s so much beauty or goodness in the world
2:03
but just when you’re enjoying it tragedy strikes and it all seems to blow away
2:08
We all have a strong sense of justice but all the time bad things happen to good people
2:14
so life is constantly is unpredictable
2:17
It’s unstable or in the teachers words like chasing after the wind, “Hevel”
2:22
now that’s kind of a downer so why is he saying all of this
2:26
the authors basic goal is to target all of the ways
2:29
that we try to build meaning and purpose in our lives apart from God
2:33
and he lets the teacher deconstruct these
2:36
So the author thinks we spend most of our time investing energy and emotion in things
2:40
that ultimately have no lasting meaning or significance
2:43
and he lets the teacher give us a hard lesson in reality
2:47
you can see this most clearly in the opening and closing poems
2:51
which focus first of all on time and then on death
2:54
so the teacher says you can spend your whole life working and achieving
2:58
because you think that makes your life meaningful
3:00
you should really stop and consider the march of time
3:03
For all of the human effort that takes place in the world, nothing really ever changes
3:08
So sure! We develop technology
3:11
and we build nations that rise and fall
3:13
but go climb a mountain and see if it cares
3:16
it was there long before any of us and it will be here long after
3:20
I mean no one’s even going to remember you or anything you did a hundred years from now
3:25
But that mountain it’ll still be there
3:27
and the ocean will still be breaking on the beach
3:29
and the Sun will still rise and set
3:32
and so time will eventually erase you and me and everything that we care about
3:38
and if that’s not disheartening enough
3:40
the teacher also can’t stop talking about death all the way through the book
3:44
but especially in this poem near the end he says death is the great equalizer and
3:49
it renders meaningless most of our daily activities it devours the wise and the
3:54
fool the rich and the poor no matter who you are
3:58
what you’ve done good or bad we’re all going to die and it’s inescapable
4:03
So with these two ideas in hand the teacher goes on to consider all the activities
4:07
and false hopes that we invest our lives in to find meaning and significance
4:11
like wealth or career or social status or pleasure
4:16
So you think working hard is going to make life worth it
4:19
think about the stress and the toll that takes on you all the anxiety and the sleepless nights
4:25
and by the time you actually earned some wealth
4:28
you’re going to be too old enjoy it anyway
4:30
and then by the time that you have to pass it on to someone
4:33
they may not even be someone who cares about anything that you did
4:36
or maybe you think pleasure is going to make life worth it for you
4:40
go for it you know live for your vacations live for the weekend party
4:44
monday always comes
4:47
“Hevel”, “Hevel”, everything is utterly “Hevel”
4:51
so what does the teacher advocate then
4:53
that we become pure hedonists or relativist
4:56
Well No! that would be “Hevel” too
4:58
the teacher acknowledges the ideas from Proverbs that living by wisdom and the fear of the Lord
5:03
that these have real advantages on the whole life will probably go better for you
5:07
See that the problem is that even living by wisdom and the fear of the Lord
5:12
they’re “Hevel” too- because they don’t guarantee a good life
5:16
Good people died tragically and horrible people live long and prosper
5:20
There’s just too many exceptions and so even wisdom is “Hevel”
5:25
Again not meaningless but an enigma
5:27
wisdom doesn’t work the way you think it should all of the time
5:31
so what’s the way forward in the midst of all this “Hevel”
5:34
and here paradoxically, the teacher discovers the key to the true enjoyment of life under the Sun
5:40
it’s accepting “Hevel”
5:43
it’s acknowledging that everything in your life is totally out of your control
5:48
about six different times at some of the bleakest moments in his monologue
5:52
the teacher talks about the gift of God
5:54
which is the enjoyment of simple good things in life
5:58
like friendship or family a good meal or a sunny day
6:04
you can’t control these things you’re certainly not guaranteed them
6:07
but that’s their beauty when I come to adopt a posture of total trust in God
6:13
it frees me to simply enjoy my life as I actually experience it
6:18
not as I think it ought to be
6:21
because even my expectations about what life ought to be are ultimately
6:25
“Hevel”, “Hevel”, everything under the Sun is utterly “Hevel”
6:30
and so the teachers words come to a close
6:33
right here at the end the author speaks up again
6:35
and he brings it all to a conclusion
6:37
he says the teachers words are very important for us to hear
6:41
he liked into them to a shepherd’s staff with a goat too pointy end
6:46
which might hurt when it pokes you
6:48
but he says the teacher is trying to poke you to get you to move in the right direction towards greater wisdom
6:54
the author then warns us that you can actually take the teachers words too far
6:59
and you could spend your whole life buried in books
7:02
trying to answer life’s existential puzzles
7:05
Don’t try~ he says you’ll never get there
7:07
and so instead the author offers his own conclusion
7:10
and it’s this: Fear God and keep his Commandments
7:14
this is the whole duty of humans
7:16
For God will bring every deed into judgment every hidden thing whether good or evil
7:23
and so the author thinks it’s good to let the teacher challenge your false hopes
7:28
and remind you that time and death make most of life completely out of your control
7:34
but what gives life true meaning is the hope of God’s judgment
7:39
the hope that one day God will clear away all of the “Hevel”
7:42
and bring true justice to our world and it’s that hope
7:46
that should fuel a life of honesty and integrity before God
7:50
despite the fact that I remain puzzled by most of life’s mysteries
7:55
and that’s the wisdom of the book of Ecclesiastes
Christy

The Book of Proverbs Explained with Illustrations by The Bible Project

The Bible Project has combined charts and images to help us understand the books of the Bible. As the narrator explains the ideas in the Book of Proverbs, you can watch illustrations take shape on a chart demonstrating the structure and flow of the text. It’s both educational and enjoyable!

 

 

Download a Free Digital Copy of the Poster from the Video

These illustrated charts are so helpful, I encourage you to download a copy for personal study. It’s free! Courtesy of The Bible Project.

[button link=”https://thebibleproject.com/product/proverbs-poster/” color=”purple” newwindow=”yes”] Proverbs Poster[/button]

 

Video Transcript

0:03
The book of Proverbs. The word proverb typically refers to a short clever
0:07
saying that offers some kind of wisdom and this book has a lot of those.
0:12
But they’re almost all in the center section of the book chapters 10 to 29.
0:16
But there is way more going on in the book of Proverbs especially at the beginning
0:21
-chapters 1 to 9- and the conclusion -chapters 30 and 31.
0:25
The book’s been designed with an introduction -chapter 1 verses 1 through 9- and it first
0:30
of all links this book to King Solomon now remember the story and first Kings chapter 3,
0:35
Solomon had asked God for wisdom to lead Israel well, and so
0:40
Solomon became known as the wisest man in the ancient world and we’re told in
0:44
first Kings chapter four, that he wrote thousands of proverbs and poems and
0:49
collected knowledge about plants and animals. So Solomon was like the
0:53
fountainhead of Israel’s wisdom literature. So while not all the material
0:58
in this book is written by him personally, he is where Israel’s wisdom
1:02
tradition began. The introduction says that by reading this book you too can
1:07
gain wisdom. Now wisdom for most of us means knowledge but the Hebrew word Khokhmah
1:12
means much more than just mental activity, it was first to action also.
1:17
So think skill or applied knowledge. This is why back in the book of Exodus chapter 31,
1:22
it was artists and craftsmen in Israel who were said to have to Khokhmah.
1:28
So the purpose of this book is to help you develop a set of practical skills for
1:32
living well in God’s world and this gets linked with another key idea in the introduction;
1:37
The fear of the Lord. Now fear here is not about terror it’s about
1:43
a healthy sense of reverence and offer God and about my place in the universe
1:48
it’s a moral mindset that recognizes I am NOT God and that I don’t get to make up
1:53
my own definitions of good and evil of right and wrong. Rather I need to humble
1:58
myself before God and embrace God’s definition of right and wrong even when
2:03
that’s inconvenient for me. Now this introduction leads us into the first
2:07
main section of the book chapters 1 through 9
2:09
which also doesn’t contain short one-liner proverbs rather what we find here
2:14
are 10 speeches from a father to a son. About how the son should listen to
2:19
wisdom and cultivate the fear of the Lord and live accordingly which means a
2:23
life of virtue and integrity and generosity all of which lead to success and peace.
2:29
The father warns his son also about folly and evil and stupid decisions that
2:34
will breed selfishness and pride all leading to ruin and shame. And so the
2:39
son should make the pursuit of wisdom and the fear of the Lord his highest goal in life.
2:44
And this way of thinking it forms the moral logic of this entire book.
2:50
Now these speeches from the father also clue us into what biblical wisdom literature is
2:54
and how it’s different from other parts of the Bible. These books explore how to
2:59
live well in God’s world but wisdom is not the same as law, like what Moses gave
3:04
Israel at Mount Sinai. And it’s not the same as prophecy, divine speech to God’s people.
3:09
Rather wisdom literature has the accumulated insight of God’s people
3:15
through the generations about how to live in a way that honors God and others.
3:20
And so through the book of Proverbs now these human words about wisdom have
3:26
been put together as God’s Word and wisdom to His people. Which connects to the
3:31
other thing you find in chapters 1 through 9. There are four poems from
3:35
lady wisdom. Here wisdom has been poetically personified as a woman who
3:40
calls out to humanity to pay attention and to seek her. Wisdom says that she is
3:46
woven into the fabric of the universe and so wherever you see people making
3:50
wise decisions they are relying on her. So you see someone being generous or
3:55
having sexual integrity or upholding justice they are drawing on wisdom.
4:02
These lady wisdom poems they’re a creative poetic way of exploring this idea that
4:07
we live in God’s moral universe and that goodness and justice are objective
4:13
realities that we ignore to our own peril. And so fearing the Lord living
4:17
wisely it’s living along the grain of the universe.
4:20
Now together these two sets of speeches from the father and Lady wisdom
4:25
they make a powerful claim about this book that you’re not simply reading good advice,
4:29
you’re reading God’s own invitation to learn wisdom from previous generations.
4:35
And so in the next section of the book chapters 10 to 29 we find
4:38
hundreds of ancient proverbs and they apply wisdom in the fear of the Lord to
4:42
every life topic you could imagine: family, work, neighborhood, friendship, sex,
4:47
marriage, money, anger, forgiveness, alcohol, debt, everything. And these are all
4:52
filtered through the value system of Proverbs 1-9. Now these proverbs they’re
4:58
all pretty short, they’re easy to memorize and actually this section of the book is
5:02
meant to become a reference work that you return to time and time again
5:06
throughout the years which raises some important issues in learning how to read these proverbs.
5:11
First of all proverbs are by nature about probabilities
5:14
So you fear the LORD and you make wise good choices,
5:18
things will likely go well for you. And if you don’t fear the LORD, you’re foolish,
5:22
your life will likely not go so well. Now that is all often true but not always.
5:30
Which leads to the next point.That proverbs are not promises, they’re not
5:35
formulas for success. So some proverbs, for example:
5:39
The fear of the Lord prolongs your life but the years of the wicked are cut short.
5:45
Or train up a child in the way they should go and when they’re old they won’t turn from it.
5:50
So yes, fearing God, being a moral person will most likely lead to a better longer life
5:56
and raising your kids in a stable loving home does set them up well.
6:00
But there are no guarantees. Lots of things can and often do go wrong in our world.
6:07
And so lastly proverbs by nature focus on the general rule but not the
6:13
exceptions. Which are many. And the wisdom books actually aren’t ignorant of that.
6:17
The exceptions are with the other wisdom books Job and Ecclesiastes, are all about.
6:22
And together these acknowledged that life is too complex for simple formulas
6:27
which is why we need all of the wisdom books together to get the bigger picture
6:31
this all leads to the final section of the book two large collections of poems
6:36
first poems from a man named Agur. Who begins by acknowledging his own
6:41
ignorance and folly, and his great need for God’s wisdom.
6:45
And then Agur discovers that divine wisdom has been given to him in the scriptures which
6:51
teach him how to live well and so Agur is put before us as like a model
6:55
reader of the book of Proverbs somebody who’s always open to hearing God’s
7:00
wisdom through the scriptures. The final poems are connected to a man named
7:04
Lemuel he’s a non-Israelite king and he passes on the wisdom that was given to him by his mom.
7:10
It´s guidance for being a wise and just leader and then the final
7:14
poem is an acrostic or an alphabet poem where each line begins with a new letter of
7:19
the Hebrew alphabet and the entire poems about the woman of noble character.
7:24
It depicts a woman who lives according to the wisdom of proverbs and stands like a
7:29
model of someone who takes God’s wisdom and then translates it into practical
7:34
decisions and everyday life. At work or at home, in her family and in her community.
7:41
So the book opens with words from a father to a son about listening
7:45
to Lady wisdom and so now the book closes by offering the words of a mother
7:50
to her son about a woman who lives wisely. The book of Proverbs is for every
7:55
person in every season of life. It’s a guide for living wisely and well in God’s good world.
8:01
And that’s what the book of Proverbs is all about.
Christy

The Book of Job Explained with Illustrations by The Bible Project

The Bible Project presents another fabulous educational video. This one is on the Book of Job. If you’ve ever wrestled with the question of why God allows suffering, you’ll feel right at home with Job. This is a righteous man who suffers and doesn’t understand why. To top it off, his friends offer their own distorted explanations by accusing him of deserving it because of hidden sin. Sounds a bit too familiar, doesn’t it?

Enjoy and learn! (Hint: You might want to watch it more than once because it’s packed with good stuff.)

 

 

 

 

Download a Free Digital Copy of the Poster from the Video

These illustrated charts are so helpful, I encourage you to download a copy for personal study. It’s free! Courtesy of The Bible Project.

[button link=”https://thebibleproject.com/product/job-poster/” color=”purple” newwindow=”yes”] Job Poster[/button]

 

Video Transcript

0:02
The book of Job. It’s a profound and very unique book in the Bible for lots of
0:07
reasons. The story is set in a very obscure land that’s far away from Israel, Uz.
0:12
The main character, Job, he’s not even an Israelite. And the author, who’s anonymous,
0:17
doesn’t even set the story in any clear period of ancient history. This all seems
0:22
intentional though. It’s like the author doesn’t want us to be distracted by
0:26
historical questions but rather to focus simply on the story of Job and on the
0:31
questions raised by his experience of suffering. The book of Job has a very
0:35
clear literary design. It opens and closes with a short narrative prologue
0:39
and then epilogue. And then the central body of the book is dense Hebrew poetry,
0:44
representing conversations between Job and four dialogue partners called “the
0:49
friends.” These conversations are then concluded by a series of poetic speeches
0:53
given by God to Job. Let’s dive in to see how it works together. The prologue
0:58
introduces us to Job and we’re told that he’s the blameless, upright man who
1:02
honors God. He’s a super good guy. And then all of a sudden were transported
1:06
into the heavenly realms and God is holding court with his staff team. It’s a
1:10
very common image in the Old Testament describing how God runs the world. And
1:14
among the heavenly beings is a figure called “the Satan,” which in hebrew
1:18
means “the Accuser” or “the Prosecutor.” It’s like we’re watching a court scene.
1:22
God presents Job as a truly righteous man and then the accuser challenges
1:28
God’s policy of rewarding righteous people like Job. He says the only reason Job
1:33
obeys you is because you bless him with prosperity. Let Job suffer– then we’ll
1:38
see how righteous he actually is. And then God agrees to let the accuser inflict
1:43
suffering on Job. Now it’s at this point in the story that most of us go, “What? Why
1:48
did God do that?” and then we assume that this book is going to answer that
1:51
question–why God allows good people to suffer. But as you read on, the book
1:56
doesn’t answer that question. Nothing in the book ever answers that question.
2:00
The prologue is setting up the real questions this book is trying to get at.
2:04
Questions about God’s justice and whether God operates the universe
2:09
according to the strict principle of justice. And the response to those
2:12
questions comes as you read through to the end of the book, not at the beginning.
2:17
The ultimate reason for Job suffering is simply never revealed. So the prologue
2:22
concludes with a suffering and bewildered Job who’s rebuked by his wife
2:26
and he’s approached by three friends who are going to try and provide wisdom and
2:30
counsel. Their names are Eliphaz the Temanite, Bildad the Shuhite, and Zophar the Naamathite.
2:35
They are all non-Israelites, like Job.
2:37
And they represent the best of ancient Near Eastern thinking
2:41
about God and suffering in the human condition. And this moves into the main
2:45
part of the book. First Job speaks. This is how this section of the book works:
2:49
first, Job is going to speak and then will follow a response from a friend.
2:53
Then Job will respond to that friend and then another friend will respond to Job’s
2:57
response and so on, back and forth for three cycles. And this whole
3:01
debate has focused on three questions: “Is God truly just in character?” and “Does God
3:06
run the universe on the strict principle of justice?” And if so, then how is Job’s
3:11
suffering to be explained? As we’re going to see, Job and the friends, they’re
3:15
working from a huge assumption about what God’s justice ought to look like in
3:20
the world, namely that every single thing that happens in the universe should
3:25
operate according to the strict principle of justice. So if you’re a wise,
3:29
good person and you honor God, good things will happen to you. God will
3:32
reward you. But if you’re evil and stupid and do sinful things, bad things will
3:37
happen to you. God will punish you. Now Job’s constant arguments throughout his
3:41
speeches is this: first of all, that he’s innocent and so the implication of that
3:45
is that his suffering is not a divine punishment. Now we know from the prologue,
3:50
both of these things are true. Remember, God Himself said Job is righteous and
3:55
blameless. And so Job concludes his argument by accusing God. God either doesn’t run
4:01
the world according to justice, or even worse, God Himself is simply unjust. The
4:06
friends, on the other hand, they beg to differ.
4:08
Their argument is that God is just. The implication being that God always runs
4:13
the world according to justice in this way and so they conclude by accusing not
4:17
God, but Job. Job must have done something really, really bad for God to
4:22
punish him like this. They even start making up possible sins that Job must
4:26
have committed. Job protests all of this. In fact, he gets so fed up with the
4:30
friends that he eventually just gives up on them. He takes up his case directly
4:34
with God. Now something to be aware of is that Job, he’s on an emotional roller
4:39
coaster in these poems. He used to think that God is just, but now he can’t
4:43
reconcile that with his suffering. And so, in some outbursts Job will accuse God
4:48
of being a bully. Once he even declares that God has orchestrated all the injustice
4:52
in the world. But the moment he utters that thought, he’s terrified of it because he
4:57
wants to hope and believe that God is truly just. Job is all over the place in
5:02
this section. And so he makes one last statement of his innocence and then he
5:06
demands that God show up personally to explain himself. Now it’s at this point
5:11
that a surprise friend shows up,
5:13
Elihu the Buzite. Now, he’s not an Israelite but he does have a Hebrew name.
5:18
And Elihu has the same assumption as Job and the friends. . He argues that God
5:22
is just and that that implies that God always operates the universe according
5:26
to justice. But then Elihu draws a more sophisticated conclusion about why good
5:32
people suffer. It may not be punishment for sin in the past.
5:36
God might inflict suffering as a warning to help people avoid sin in the future. Or
5:41
God might use pain and suffering to build character or to teach people valuable
5:45
lessons. Elihu doesn’t claim to know why Job is suffering but one thing he is certain
5:50
of: Job is wrong to accuse God of being unjust. Job doesn’t even respond to Elihu and
5:57
the dialogues come to a close . It’s like the wisdom of the Ancients has been
6:01
spent and the mystery remains. And then all of a sudden God shows up in a
6:06
whirlwind and he responds to Job personally. He first responds to Job’s
6:10
accusation that he is unjust and incompetent at running the universe. So
6:15
God takes Job on a virtual tour of the universe and he starts asking him all these
6:19
questions about the order and origins of the cosmos. Was Job ever around when God
6:25
architected the earth or organized the constellations? Has Job ever commanded
6:29
the sunrise or controlled the weather?
6:31
God has his eyes on all of these cosmic details that Job has never even
6:36
conceived of. Then God starts going into detail describing the grazing habits of
6:41
mountain goats and how deer give birth, or the feeding patterns of lions and
6:46
wild donkeys. What’s the point of all this? Remember the assumption of Job and
6:50
his friends about what it looks like for God to run the world according to
6:54
justice.
6:55
Underneath that assumption is a deeper one that Job and his friends have a wide
7:00
enough perspective on life to make such a claim about how God ought to run the world.
7:05
And God’s response with this virtual tour, it deconstructs all of these assumptions.
7:09
It first of all shows that the universe is a vast, complex place and
7:14
that God has his eyes on all of it–every detail. Job on the other hand, has only
7:20
the small horizon of his life experience to draw from. His view of the world is
7:24
very limited and so what looks like divine injustice from Job’s point of
7:29
view needs to be seen in an infinitely larger context. Job is simply not in a
7:34
position to make such a huge accusation about God. After the virtual tour, God
7:39
asks Job if he would like to micromanage the world for a day according to the
7:44
strict principle of justice that Job and his friends assume; punishing every evil deed of
7:49
every person at every moment with precise retribution.
7:53
The fact is that carrying out justice in a world like ours, it’s extremely complex.
7:58
It’s never black and white like Job and the friends seem to think. Which leads to
8:03
God’s last point. He starts describing these two fantastic creatures, Behemoth
8:08
and Leviathan, which some people think are poetic depictions of the hippo and
8:12
crocodile. More likely they refer to well-known creatures from ancient Near
8:16
Eastern mythology that are used elsewhere in the Bible as symbols of the
8:21
disorder and danger that exists in God’s good world. These creatures, they’re not
8:26
evil. God is actually quite proud of them. But they’re not safe either. The point is
8:30
that God’s world is amazing
8:32
and very good but it’s not perfect or always safe. God’s world has order and
8:37
beauty but it’s also wild and sometimes dangerous, just like these two
8:42
fantastic creatures. And so we come back to the big question of Job’s suffering.
8:47
Why is there suffering in God’s world– whether it’s from earthquakes or wild
8:51
animals or from other humans. God doesn’t explain why. What he says is that
8:56
we live in an extremely complex, amazing world that at this stage at least is not
9:02
designed to prevent suffering. And that’s God’s response. Job challenged God’s
9:07
justice. God responds that Job doesn’t have sufficient knowledge about our
9:11
universe to make such a claim.
9:13
Job demanded a full explanation from God and what God asked Job for is trust
9:18
in His wisdom and character. And so, Job responds with humility and repentance. He
9:24
apologizes for accusing God and he acknowledges that he’s overstepped his
9:28
bounds. Then all of a sudden the book concludes with a short epilogue. First
9:32
God says that the friends were wrong, that their ideas about God’s justice
9:36
were just too simple– not true to the complexity of the world or God’s wisdom.
9:41
And then God says that Job has spoken rightly about him. Now this is surprising
9:46
because it can’t apply to everything
9:48
Job said. I mean we know Job drew hasty and wrong conclusions, but God still
9:53
approves of Job’s wrestling. How Job came honestly before God with all of his
9:58
emotion and pain and simply wanted to talk to God himself. And God says that’s
10:03
the right way to process through all of this, through the struggle of prayer. The book
10:08
concludes with Job having his health, his family, his wealth,
10:11
all restored– not as a reward for good behavior but simply as a generous gift
10:16
from God. And that’s the end of the book. The book of Job, it doesn’t unlock the
10:20
puzzle of why bad things happen to good people. Rather it does invite us to trust
10:25
God’s wisdom when we do encounter suffering rather than try and figure out
10:30
the reason for it. When we search for reasons we tend to either simplify
10:34
God–like the friends– or like Job, accuse God, but based on limited
10:39
evidence. And so the book is inviting us to honestly bring our pain and our grief to God and
10:45
to trust that God actually cares and that he knows what he’s doing. And that’s
10:49
what the book of Job is all about.
Christy

An Animated Explanation of the Book of Job by The Bible Project

“Why?”

We’ve all asked God, “Why?” It’s a universal question. We want to make sense out of the pain and tragedy we experience. We want to understand why God allows us to experience such pain. Isn’t God loving and just? Is it fair to make a good person suffer?

These are the questions Job wrestled with after God took everything away from him. His friends wanted to blame his tragedy on Job’s sin, but Job was a righteous man. So why?

The Bible Project made an excellent video summarizing the issues in the Book of Job. There are no easy answers, but life goes on and can be beautiful again after tragedy strikes.

 

 

 

 

Video Transcript

0:04
There are three books in the Bible known as the wisdom literature
0:08
Proverbs, Ecclesiastes and Job
0:11
The first proverbs showed us that God is wise and just
0:15
Yeah we learned that God has ordered the world so that it’s fair
0:18
the righteous are rewarded the wicked are punished
0:22
in other words you get what you deserve.
0:23
But then we meet Ecclesiastes who observes people don’t always get what they deserve
0:29
Yeah he said the world isn’t always fair.
0:32
The life is unpredictable and hard to comprehend just like smoke.
0:37
And this makes you wonder okay well is God wise and just?
0:41
Exactly and so it’s that question that is being
0:44
explored in the final book of wisdom Job.
0:48
Alright let’s dive in.
0:51
So Job begins with the strange story that takes place up in the heavens which are described
0:56
something like a heavenly command center.
0:58
So God is there with these angelic creatures called the sons of God and
1:03
they’re all their reporting for duty.
1:05
And God points out this guy Job his servant showing our righteous and good he is.
1:10
Then one of these angelic creatures approaches He’s referred to in Hebrew as
1:15
The Satan.
1:16
The Satan, who is this?
1:18
Well, this word is actually a title which literally means the one who is opposed.
1:23
So out of this whole crew he is the one questioning how God is running the world.
1:28
And he proposes that Job might not actually love God
1:31
that he’s only a good person because God rewards him.
1:34
If God were to take away all of the good things he gave to Job then
1:38
we would see his true colors.
1:41
So he thinks Job is just working the system?
1:44
That’s exactly right. Maybe he’s obeying just to get what he wants.
1:48
So God agrees to this experiment and allows the Satan to
1:53
inflict suffering on Job.
1:56
And Job losses everyone and everything that he cares about. It is devastating.
2:02
And remember he deserves none of this God himself said so
2:06
The remarkable thing is that in the midst of all this suffering,
2:10
Job still praises God.
2:12
At least for chapters one and two.
2:15
But then in chapter 3 we find out how he’s really feeling inside.
2:19
He unleashes this palm that reveals this devastation.
2:23
It’s a long elaborate curse on the day that he was born
2:26
After this some of Job’s friends come to visit him
2:30
to offer their help and all of them are like
2:32
Job, you must have done something horribly wrong to deserve this.
2:35
After all, we know God is just and we know the world is ordered by God’s justice and fairness
2:41
so you must be getting what you deserve.
2:45
And for the next thirty four chapters the friends and Job go back and forth
2:49
in very dense Hebrew poetry.
2:51
His friends keep speculating about why God might have sent such suffering
2:56
and even start making up lists of hypothetical sins that Job must have committed.
3:00
But after each accusation Job defends his innocence.
3:04
And Job is innocent.
3:06
He is! He’s also on an emotional roller coaster
3:09
At some moments he’s very confident that God is still wise and just.
3:13
Yet another moments he’s doubting God’s goodness.
3:16
He even comes to accuse God of being reckless unfair and corrupt.
3:21
So by the end of the dialogue Job demands that God come and explain himself in person.
3:28
And God does so he comes in the form of a great storm cloud
3:33
Now God doesn’t give Job a direct answer.
3:37
He doesn’t tell Job about the conversation with the Satan
3:40
Yeah he does something very different . He takes Job on a virtual tour of the universe.
3:45
He shows Job how grand the world is.
3:48
And he asked him if he’s even capable of running it or
3:51
understanding it just for a day .
3:54
He shows how much detail there is in the world.
3:57
Things that we might see every day but really don’t understand at all.
4:02
But God does he knows it all intimately.
4:05
He pays attention to the beauty and operations of the universe in ways that we haven’t even imagined
4:11
and in places that we will never see.
4:14
Then to conclude God shows Job two wonderous beasts and
4:19
brags about how great they are.
4:21
Yeah they are dangerous.
4:23
I mean they would kill you without even thinking about it
4:26
And God says they’re not evil.
4:30
They’re actually a part of his good world.
4:33
And then that’s it that’s God’s whole defense.
4:37
It’s kind of weird. I mean what was this all about?
4:41
It seems to be this. From Job’s point of view it looks like God is not just.
4:47
But God’s perspective is infinitely bigger.
4:50
He is dynamically interacting with a whole universe of complexity when he makes decisions.
4:56
And this is what God calls his wisdom.
4:59
So Job asking God to defend himself is actually kind of absurd.
5:04
He couldn’t comprehend this kind of complexity even if he wanted to.
5:08
So where does this leave us?
5:11
Well, leaves Job in a place of humility. He never learned why he suffered.
5:16
And yet he’s able to live in peace and in the fear of the Lord
5:22
But that’s not where the book ends because after this God restores to Job double everything he had lost.
5:29
And this again is surprising. I mean, is this a reward, is God saying
5:33
“Congratulations Job you passed this elaborate test.”
5:36
No I mean the whole book just made the
5:38
point that Job losing everything was not a punishment and so now getting it back isn’t a reward.
5:44
So why is he gonna get back?
5:46
Apparently God in His wisdom decided to give Job a gift
5:49
we don’t know why but what we do know is that
5:52
Job is now the kind of person who no matter what comes
5:56
good or bad he can trust God’s wisdom
6:00
And that’s the book of Job and the end of our wisdom series.
6:04
These biblical books of wisdom are amazing.
6:07
Each one offers a unique perspective on the good life.
6:10
And you need to hear all of them together
6:13
as you learn to live with wisdom and in the fear of the Lord
6:18
hey guys thank you for watching this
6:19
video from the Bible project you can
6:21
find a lot more videos just like this
6:23
one on our youtube channel the Bible
6:25
project or at our website join the Bible
6:27
project.com this was the final video in
6:30
our wisdom series it’s been super fun to
6:33
make we hope they were helpful for you
6:34
for making videos like this because we
6:36
believe the Bible is a unified story
6:38
that leads to Jesus and has wisdom for
6:40
the modern world so we’re making videos
6:42
that explore every book of the Bible its
6:44
unique design main ideas
6:46
we’re also making themed videos that
6:48
explore key ideas that run through the
6:50
whole storyline of the scriptures we
6:52
have more videos planned and we can do
6:54
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6:56
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7:11
resources it’s there for free for you
7:13
thanks for your support