Christy

The Book of Job Explained with Illustrations by The Bible Project

The Bible Project presents another fabulous educational video. This one is on the Book of Job. If you’ve ever wrestled with the question of why God allows suffering, you’ll feel right at home with Job. This is a righteous man who suffers and doesn’t understand why. To top it off, his friends offer their own distorted explanations by accusing him of deserving it because of hidden sin. Sounds a bit too familiar, doesn’t it?

Enjoy and learn! (Hint: You might want to watch it more than once because it’s packed with good stuff.)

 

 

 

 

Download a Free Digital Copy of the Poster from the Video

These illustrated charts are so helpful, I encourage you to download a copy for personal study. It’s free! Courtesy of The Bible Project.

[button link=”https://thebibleproject.com/product/job-poster/” color=”purple” newwindow=”yes”] Job Poster[/button]

 

Video Transcript

0:02
The book of Job. It’s a profound and very unique book in the Bible for lots of
0:07
reasons. The story is set in a very obscure land that’s far away from Israel, Uz.
0:12
The main character, Job, he’s not even an Israelite. And the author, who’s anonymous,
0:17
doesn’t even set the story in any clear period of ancient history. This all seems
0:22
intentional though. It’s like the author doesn’t want us to be distracted by
0:26
historical questions but rather to focus simply on the story of Job and on the
0:31
questions raised by his experience of suffering. The book of Job has a very
0:35
clear literary design. It opens and closes with a short narrative prologue
0:39
and then epilogue. And then the central body of the book is dense Hebrew poetry,
0:44
representing conversations between Job and four dialogue partners called “the
0:49
friends.” These conversations are then concluded by a series of poetic speeches
0:53
given by God to Job. Let’s dive in to see how it works together. The prologue
0:58
introduces us to Job and we’re told that he’s the blameless, upright man who
1:02
honors God. He’s a super good guy. And then all of a sudden were transported
1:06
into the heavenly realms and God is holding court with his staff team. It’s a
1:10
very common image in the Old Testament describing how God runs the world. And
1:14
among the heavenly beings is a figure called “the Satan,” which in hebrew
1:18
means “the Accuser” or “the Prosecutor.” It’s like we’re watching a court scene.
1:22
God presents Job as a truly righteous man and then the accuser challenges
1:28
God’s policy of rewarding righteous people like Job. He says the only reason Job
1:33
obeys you is because you bless him with prosperity. Let Job suffer– then we’ll
1:38
see how righteous he actually is. And then God agrees to let the accuser inflict
1:43
suffering on Job. Now it’s at this point in the story that most of us go, “What? Why
1:48
did God do that?” and then we assume that this book is going to answer that
1:51
question–why God allows good people to suffer. But as you read on, the book
1:56
doesn’t answer that question. Nothing in the book ever answers that question.
2:00
The prologue is setting up the real questions this book is trying to get at.
2:04
Questions about God’s justice and whether God operates the universe
2:09
according to the strict principle of justice. And the response to those
2:12
questions comes as you read through to the end of the book, not at the beginning.
2:17
The ultimate reason for Job suffering is simply never revealed. So the prologue
2:22
concludes with a suffering and bewildered Job who’s rebuked by his wife
2:26
and he’s approached by three friends who are going to try and provide wisdom and
2:30
counsel. Their names are Eliphaz the Temanite, Bildad the Shuhite, and Zophar the Naamathite.
2:35
They are all non-Israelites, like Job.
2:37
And they represent the best of ancient Near Eastern thinking
2:41
about God and suffering in the human condition. And this moves into the main
2:45
part of the book. First Job speaks. This is how this section of the book works:
2:49
first, Job is going to speak and then will follow a response from a friend.
2:53
Then Job will respond to that friend and then another friend will respond to Job’s
2:57
response and so on, back and forth for three cycles. And this whole
3:01
debate has focused on three questions: “Is God truly just in character?” and “Does God
3:06
run the universe on the strict principle of justice?” And if so, then how is Job’s
3:11
suffering to be explained? As we’re going to see, Job and the friends, they’re
3:15
working from a huge assumption about what God’s justice ought to look like in
3:20
the world, namely that every single thing that happens in the universe should
3:25
operate according to the strict principle of justice. So if you’re a wise,
3:29
good person and you honor God, good things will happen to you. God will
3:32
reward you. But if you’re evil and stupid and do sinful things, bad things will
3:37
happen to you. God will punish you. Now Job’s constant arguments throughout his
3:41
speeches is this: first of all, that he’s innocent and so the implication of that
3:45
is that his suffering is not a divine punishment. Now we know from the prologue,
3:50
both of these things are true. Remember, God Himself said Job is righteous and
3:55
blameless. And so Job concludes his argument by accusing God. God either doesn’t run
4:01
the world according to justice, or even worse, God Himself is simply unjust. The
4:06
friends, on the other hand, they beg to differ.
4:08
Their argument is that God is just. The implication being that God always runs
4:13
the world according to justice in this way and so they conclude by accusing not
4:17
God, but Job. Job must have done something really, really bad for God to
4:22
punish him like this. They even start making up possible sins that Job must
4:26
have committed. Job protests all of this. In fact, he gets so fed up with the
4:30
friends that he eventually just gives up on them. He takes up his case directly
4:34
with God. Now something to be aware of is that Job, he’s on an emotional roller
4:39
coaster in these poems. He used to think that God is just, but now he can’t
4:43
reconcile that with his suffering. And so, in some outbursts Job will accuse God
4:48
of being a bully. Once he even declares that God has orchestrated all the injustice
4:52
in the world. But the moment he utters that thought, he’s terrified of it because he
4:57
wants to hope and believe that God is truly just. Job is all over the place in
5:02
this section. And so he makes one last statement of his innocence and then he
5:06
demands that God show up personally to explain himself. Now it’s at this point
5:11
that a surprise friend shows up,
5:13
Elihu the Buzite. Now, he’s not an Israelite but he does have a Hebrew name.
5:18
And Elihu has the same assumption as Job and the friends. . He argues that God
5:22
is just and that that implies that God always operates the universe according
5:26
to justice. But then Elihu draws a more sophisticated conclusion about why good
5:32
people suffer. It may not be punishment for sin in the past.
5:36
God might inflict suffering as a warning to help people avoid sin in the future. Or
5:41
God might use pain and suffering to build character or to teach people valuable
5:45
lessons. Elihu doesn’t claim to know why Job is suffering but one thing he is certain
5:50
of: Job is wrong to accuse God of being unjust. Job doesn’t even respond to Elihu and
5:57
the dialogues come to a close . It’s like the wisdom of the Ancients has been
6:01
spent and the mystery remains. And then all of a sudden God shows up in a
6:06
whirlwind and he responds to Job personally. He first responds to Job’s
6:10
accusation that he is unjust and incompetent at running the universe. So
6:15
God takes Job on a virtual tour of the universe and he starts asking him all these
6:19
questions about the order and origins of the cosmos. Was Job ever around when God
6:25
architected the earth or organized the constellations? Has Job ever commanded
6:29
the sunrise or controlled the weather?
6:31
God has his eyes on all of these cosmic details that Job has never even
6:36
conceived of. Then God starts going into detail describing the grazing habits of
6:41
mountain goats and how deer give birth, or the feeding patterns of lions and
6:46
wild donkeys. What’s the point of all this? Remember the assumption of Job and
6:50
his friends about what it looks like for God to run the world according to
6:54
justice.
6:55
Underneath that assumption is a deeper one that Job and his friends have a wide
7:00
enough perspective on life to make such a claim about how God ought to run the world.
7:05
And God’s response with this virtual tour, it deconstructs all of these assumptions.
7:09
It first of all shows that the universe is a vast, complex place and
7:14
that God has his eyes on all of it–every detail. Job on the other hand, has only
7:20
the small horizon of his life experience to draw from. His view of the world is
7:24
very limited and so what looks like divine injustice from Job’s point of
7:29
view needs to be seen in an infinitely larger context. Job is simply not in a
7:34
position to make such a huge accusation about God. After the virtual tour, God
7:39
asks Job if he would like to micromanage the world for a day according to the
7:44
strict principle of justice that Job and his friends assume; punishing every evil deed of
7:49
every person at every moment with precise retribution.
7:53
The fact is that carrying out justice in a world like ours, it’s extremely complex.
7:58
It’s never black and white like Job and the friends seem to think. Which leads to
8:03
God’s last point. He starts describing these two fantastic creatures, Behemoth
8:08
and Leviathan, which some people think are poetic depictions of the hippo and
8:12
crocodile. More likely they refer to well-known creatures from ancient Near
8:16
Eastern mythology that are used elsewhere in the Bible as symbols of the
8:21
disorder and danger that exists in God’s good world. These creatures, they’re not
8:26
evil. God is actually quite proud of them. But they’re not safe either. The point is
8:30
that God’s world is amazing
8:32
and very good but it’s not perfect or always safe. God’s world has order and
8:37
beauty but it’s also wild and sometimes dangerous, just like these two
8:42
fantastic creatures. And so we come back to the big question of Job’s suffering.
8:47
Why is there suffering in God’s world– whether it’s from earthquakes or wild
8:51
animals or from other humans. God doesn’t explain why. What he says is that
8:56
we live in an extremely complex, amazing world that at this stage at least is not
9:02
designed to prevent suffering. And that’s God’s response. Job challenged God’s
9:07
justice. God responds that Job doesn’t have sufficient knowledge about our
9:11
universe to make such a claim.
9:13
Job demanded a full explanation from God and what God asked Job for is trust
9:18
in His wisdom and character. And so, Job responds with humility and repentance. He
9:24
apologizes for accusing God and he acknowledges that he’s overstepped his
9:28
bounds. Then all of a sudden the book concludes with a short epilogue. First
9:32
God says that the friends were wrong, that their ideas about God’s justice
9:36
were just too simple– not true to the complexity of the world or God’s wisdom.
9:41
And then God says that Job has spoken rightly about him. Now this is surprising
9:46
because it can’t apply to everything
9:48
Job said. I mean we know Job drew hasty and wrong conclusions, but God still
9:53
approves of Job’s wrestling. How Job came honestly before God with all of his
9:58
emotion and pain and simply wanted to talk to God himself. And God says that’s
10:03
the right way to process through all of this, through the struggle of prayer. The book
10:08
concludes with Job having his health, his family, his wealth,
10:11
all restored– not as a reward for good behavior but simply as a generous gift
10:16
from God. And that’s the end of the book. The book of Job, it doesn’t unlock the
10:20
puzzle of why bad things happen to good people. Rather it does invite us to trust
10:25
God’s wisdom when we do encounter suffering rather than try and figure out
10:30
the reason for it. When we search for reasons we tend to either simplify
10:34
God–like the friends– or like Job, accuse God, but based on limited
10:39
evidence. And so the book is inviting us to honestly bring our pain and our grief to God and
10:45
to trust that God actually cares and that he knows what he’s doing. And that’s
10:49
what the book of Job is all about.
Christy

An Animated Explanation of the Book of Job by The Bible Project

“Why?”

We’ve all asked God, “Why?” It’s a universal question. We want to make sense out of the pain and tragedy we experience. We want to understand why God allows us to experience such pain. Isn’t God loving and just? Is it fair to make a good person suffer?

These are the questions Job wrestled with after God took everything away from him. His friends wanted to blame his tragedy on Job’s sin, but Job was a righteous man. So why?

The Bible Project made an excellent video summarizing the issues in the Book of Job. There are no easy answers, but life goes on and can be beautiful again after tragedy strikes.

 

 

 

 

Video Transcript

0:04
There are three books in the Bible known as the wisdom literature
0:08
Proverbs, Ecclesiastes and Job
0:11
The first proverbs showed us that God is wise and just
0:15
Yeah we learned that God has ordered the world so that it’s fair
0:18
the righteous are rewarded the wicked are punished
0:22
in other words you get what you deserve.
0:23
But then we meet Ecclesiastes who observes people don’t always get what they deserve
0:29
Yeah he said the world isn’t always fair.
0:32
The life is unpredictable and hard to comprehend just like smoke.
0:37
And this makes you wonder okay well is God wise and just?
0:41
Exactly and so it’s that question that is being
0:44
explored in the final book of wisdom Job.
0:48
Alright let’s dive in.
0:51
So Job begins with the strange story that takes place up in the heavens which are described
0:56
something like a heavenly command center.
0:58
So God is there with these angelic creatures called the sons of God and
1:03
they’re all their reporting for duty.
1:05
And God points out this guy Job his servant showing our righteous and good he is.
1:10
Then one of these angelic creatures approaches He’s referred to in Hebrew as
1:15
The Satan.
1:16
The Satan, who is this?
1:18
Well, this word is actually a title which literally means the one who is opposed.
1:23
So out of this whole crew he is the one questioning how God is running the world.
1:28
And he proposes that Job might not actually love God
1:31
that he’s only a good person because God rewards him.
1:34
If God were to take away all of the good things he gave to Job then
1:38
we would see his true colors.
1:41
So he thinks Job is just working the system?
1:44
That’s exactly right. Maybe he’s obeying just to get what he wants.
1:48
So God agrees to this experiment and allows the Satan to
1:53
inflict suffering on Job.
1:56
And Job losses everyone and everything that he cares about. It is devastating.
2:02
And remember he deserves none of this God himself said so
2:06
The remarkable thing is that in the midst of all this suffering,
2:10
Job still praises God.
2:12
At least for chapters one and two.
2:15
But then in chapter 3 we find out how he’s really feeling inside.
2:19
He unleashes this palm that reveals this devastation.
2:23
It’s a long elaborate curse on the day that he was born
2:26
After this some of Job’s friends come to visit him
2:30
to offer their help and all of them are like
2:32
Job, you must have done something horribly wrong to deserve this.
2:35
After all, we know God is just and we know the world is ordered by God’s justice and fairness
2:41
so you must be getting what you deserve.
2:45
And for the next thirty four chapters the friends and Job go back and forth
2:49
in very dense Hebrew poetry.
2:51
His friends keep speculating about why God might have sent such suffering
2:56
and even start making up lists of hypothetical sins that Job must have committed.
3:00
But after each accusation Job defends his innocence.
3:04
And Job is innocent.
3:06
He is! He’s also on an emotional roller coaster
3:09
At some moments he’s very confident that God is still wise and just.
3:13
Yet another moments he’s doubting God’s goodness.
3:16
He even comes to accuse God of being reckless unfair and corrupt.
3:21
So by the end of the dialogue Job demands that God come and explain himself in person.
3:28
And God does so he comes in the form of a great storm cloud
3:33
Now God doesn’t give Job a direct answer.
3:37
He doesn’t tell Job about the conversation with the Satan
3:40
Yeah he does something very different . He takes Job on a virtual tour of the universe.
3:45
He shows Job how grand the world is.
3:48
And he asked him if he’s even capable of running it or
3:51
understanding it just for a day .
3:54
He shows how much detail there is in the world.
3:57
Things that we might see every day but really don’t understand at all.
4:02
But God does he knows it all intimately.
4:05
He pays attention to the beauty and operations of the universe in ways that we haven’t even imagined
4:11
and in places that we will never see.
4:14
Then to conclude God shows Job two wonderous beasts and
4:19
brags about how great they are.
4:21
Yeah they are dangerous.
4:23
I mean they would kill you without even thinking about it
4:26
And God says they’re not evil.
4:30
They’re actually a part of his good world.
4:33
And then that’s it that’s God’s whole defense.
4:37
It’s kind of weird. I mean what was this all about?
4:41
It seems to be this. From Job’s point of view it looks like God is not just.
4:47
But God’s perspective is infinitely bigger.
4:50
He is dynamically interacting with a whole universe of complexity when he makes decisions.
4:56
And this is what God calls his wisdom.
4:59
So Job asking God to defend himself is actually kind of absurd.
5:04
He couldn’t comprehend this kind of complexity even if he wanted to.
5:08
So where does this leave us?
5:11
Well, leaves Job in a place of humility. He never learned why he suffered.
5:16
And yet he’s able to live in peace and in the fear of the Lord
5:22
But that’s not where the book ends because after this God restores to Job double everything he had lost.
5:29
And this again is surprising. I mean, is this a reward, is God saying
5:33
“Congratulations Job you passed this elaborate test.”
5:36
No I mean the whole book just made the
5:38
point that Job losing everything was not a punishment and so now getting it back isn’t a reward.
5:44
So why is he gonna get back?
5:46
Apparently God in His wisdom decided to give Job a gift
5:49
we don’t know why but what we do know is that
5:52
Job is now the kind of person who no matter what comes
5:56
good or bad he can trust God’s wisdom
6:00
And that’s the book of Job and the end of our wisdom series.
6:04
These biblical books of wisdom are amazing.
6:07
Each one offers a unique perspective on the good life.
6:10
And you need to hear all of them together
6:13
as you learn to live with wisdom and in the fear of the Lord
6:18
hey guys thank you for watching this
6:19
video from the Bible project you can
6:21
find a lot more videos just like this
6:23
one on our youtube channel the Bible
6:25
project or at our website join the Bible
6:27
project.com this was the final video in
6:30
our wisdom series it’s been super fun to
6:33
make we hope they were helpful for you
6:34
for making videos like this because we
6:36
believe the Bible is a unified story
6:38
that leads to Jesus and has wisdom for
6:40
the modern world so we’re making videos
6:42
that explore every book of the Bible its
6:44
unique design main ideas
6:46
we’re also making themed videos that
6:48
explore key ideas that run through the
6:50
whole storyline of the scriptures we
6:52
have more videos planned and we can do
6:54
it because of your support you can give
6:56
a one-time gift for you become a monthly
6:58
supporter and help us with this entire
7:00
project
7:01
the goal is to make the whole video
7:02
library available for free to anybody
7:05
anywhere go to join the Bible project
7:07
com you can download full resolution
7:09
version of this video all kinds of other
7:11
resources it’s there for free for you
7:13
thanks for your support

 

 

Christy

The Book of Ruth Explained with Illustrations by The Bible Project

The Book of Ruth begins with tragedy and death. After losing her husband and both sons in a foreign land during a famine, Naomi changes her name to Mara, meaning “bitterness.” She feels God has taken everything away from her and her life is miserable now. While it looked like God was punishing her, it becomes clear that God is setting up the circumstances by which He could bless her. As her Moabite daughter-in-law, Ruth, cares for her, finds provision, and discovers the love of a benefactor, Naomi comes to realize God has turned her tragedy into joy. Watch this video by The Bible Project to learn more about the biography of Ruth.

 

 

 

 

Download a Free Digital Copy of the Poster from the Video

These illustrated charts are so helpful, I encourage you to download a copy for personal study. It’s free! Courtesy of The Bible Project.

[button link=”https://thebibleproject.com/product/ruth-poster/” color=”purple” newwindow=”yes”] Ruth Poster[/button]

 

 

Video Transcript

0:02
The book of Ruth.
0:03
It’s a brilliant work of theological art and it invites us to reflect on the question of
0:09
how God is involved in the day-to-day joys and hardships of our lives.
0:14
There are three main characters in the book:
0:16
Naomi, the widow, Ruth, the Moabite and Boaz, the Israelite farmer.
0:21
And their story is told in four chapters that are beautifully designed.
0:25
Let’s just dive in and see how this all unfolds. Chapter one opens with this line: “In the days when the judges
0:32
ruled.” And it reminds us of the very dark and difficult days from the book of
0:36
Judges. And here we meet an Israelite family in Bethlehem struggling to
0:41
survive through a famine. And so, in search of food, they move on to the land
0:45
of Moab, Israel’s ancient enemy. And there, the father of the family dies and the
0:51
sons marry two Moabite women, Ruth and Orpah. And then the sons, they die too and so
0:57
they leave only Naomi and these new daughters-in-law. And so Naomi, she has no
1:02
reason to stay anymore. And so she tells her new daughters-in-law that she’s
1:06
moving back home. And Naomi, she knows that the life of an unmarried foreign
1:11
widow in Israel is going to be very hard. So she compels the women to stay behind.
1:16
Orpah agrees but Ruth does not. She shows remarkable loyalty to Naomi and she says,
1:23
“Wherever you go, I’m going to go. Your people will become my people and your God will
1:29
become my God.” And so the two of them return to Israel together and the chapter
1:34
concludes with Naomi changing her name
1:37
to Mara, which means “bitter” in Hebrew, and she laments her tragic fate. Chapter
1:42
two begins with Naomi and Ruth discussing where they’re going to find
1:46
food and it just so happens to be the beginning of the barley harvest. And so
1:51
Ruth goes out to look for food and it just so happens that she ends up
1:54
picking grain in the field of a man named Boaz, who just so happens to be
1:59
Naomi’s relative. We’re told that Boaz is a man of noble character and
2:04
he notices her. So after finding out more about her story, he shows remarkable
2:09
generosity to her. He makes these special provisions so that the immigrant Ruth
2:14
can gather grain in his field. And in doing so
2:17
Boaz is actually obeying an explicit command in the Torah to show generosity
2:21
to the immigrant and the poor. Boaz is so impressed by Ruth’s loyalty to Naomi,
2:27
he prays for her that God will reward her for her boldness. So Ruth comes home
2:32
that day and Naomi finds out that she met Boaz and she is thrilled. She says
2:39
Boaz is their family Redeemer. Now this “family redeemer” thing, this was a
2:44
cultural practice in Israel where if a man in the family died and he left
2:48
behind a wife or children or land, it was the family Redeemer’s responsibility to
2:52
marry that widow, to take up the land and protect that family. So Naomi, she
2:57
begins to hope that perhaps there might still be a future for her family.
3:02
Chapter 3 begins with Naomi and Ruth making a plan to get Boaz to notice
3:07
their situation. So Ruth is going to stop wearing clothes of a grieving
3:11
widow and she’s going to show signs that she is available to be married. And so
3:15
Ruth goes to meet Boaz on the farm that night and as she approaches, Boaz wakes
3:20
up. And he’s totally startled. And Ruth makes her intentions very clear. She asks
3:25
if Boaz will redeem Naomi’s family and marry her.
3:29
Boaz is once again amazed by Ruth’s loyalty to Naomi and her family and he calls
3:34
Ruth a woman of noble character. It’s the same term used to describe the woman in
3:40
Proverbs 31. So Boaz tells Ruth to wait until the next day and he will
3:45
redeem both Ruth and Naomi legally before the town elders. And so the
3:49
chapter ends with Ruth returning to Naomi and they marvel together at all of
3:54
these recent events. In chapter four it all comes together. It turns out, at the
3:58
last minute,
3:59
Boaz discovers there is a family member who’s closer to Naomi than he is and
4:04
he’s actually eligible before him to redeem the family. But at the last second
4:09
this family member finds out that he’s going to have to marry Ruth the Moabite.
4:13
And so he declines. But Boaz, remember, he knows Ruth’s true character, and so he
4:18
acquires the family property of Naomi and he marries Ruth. And so just as at the
4:24
beginning, how Ruth was loyal to Naomi’s family, so now Boaz is loyal to Naomi’s
4:30
family as well.
4:31
The story concludes with a reversal of all of the tragedies from chapter one. So
4:36
the death of the husband and the sons is reversed as Ruth is married again and
4:41
gives birth to a new son, granting joy to Naomi. And this symmetry between the opening and
4:47
the closing, its even more remarkable.
4:49
So, remember the opening tragedy was followed by a great act of loyalty on the
4:53
part of Ruth and that is now matched by Boaz’s act of loyalty that leads to the
4:59
family’s final restoration. And this symmetry, it highlights the design of the
5:04
internal chapters as well.
5:06
Each of the chapters begins with Naomi and Ruth making a plan for the future.
5:10
And that’s followed by a providential meeting between Ruth and Boaz. And each
5:15
chapter concludes with Naomi and Ruth rejoicing at what’s taken place. This
5:21
story is beautifully designed and that design actually connects with the really
5:25
interesting feature of the story and that’s how little God is mentioned. The
5:30
characters talk about God a few times but the narrator actually never once
5:35
mentions God doing anything directly in the story and that its brilliance–
5:41
because God’s providence is at work behind every scene of the story, weaving
5:46
together the circumstances and choices of all these characters. So Naomi, her
5:50
tragedy leads her to think that God is punishing her but actually the whole
5:54
story is about God’s mission to restore her and her family. And he’s doing so
5:59
through Ruth, through her boldness and loyalty, which brings healing to Naomi’s life. But
6:05
not without Boaz, who’s a no-nonsense farmer who’s full of generosity and
6:10
loyalty. And so God uses his integrity combined with Ruth’s boldness to save
6:15
Naomi and
6:16
her family. So this story brilliantly explores the interplay of God’s purposes
6:22
and will with human decision and will. God weaves together the faithful
6:27
obedience of his people to bring about his redemptive purposes in the world. And
6:32
that leads to the real end of the story. The Book of Ruth concludes with the
6:36
genealogy showing how Boaz and Ruth’s son, Obed, was the grandfather of King
6:42
David, from whom came the lineage of the Messiah. And so all of a sudden these
6:48
seemingly mundane, ordinary events in the story are woven into God’s grand story
6:54
of redemption for the whole world. And so the book of Ruth invites us to consider
7:00
how God might be at work in the very ordinary, mundane details of our lives as
7:07
well. And that’s what the book of Ruth is all about.