Christy

The Book of Genesis Ch. 12-50 Explained with Illustrations by The Bible Project

In part 2 of the illustrated explanation of Genesis, we will get an overview of the key people: Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, and Joseph. God promises to bless Abraham’s family line, so the rest of Genesis explores the events of Abraham’s family. Genesis doesn’t gloss over things, either. It portrays flawed, sinful people, but it also depicts how God works in and among them, even at their worst.

This ought to be a great comfort to us because we know ourselves to be flawed, sinful people. There is hope for us, too, because just as God worked through Abraham’s family, He will work through us despite our weaknesses.

 

 

 

 

Download a Free Digital Copy of the Poster from the Video

These illustrated charts are so helpful, I encourage you to download a copy for personal study. It’s free! Courtesy of The Bible Project.

[button link=”https://thebibleproject.com/product/genesis-poster/” color=”purple” newwindow=”yes”] Genesis Poster[/button]

 

 

Video Transcript

0:04
The book of Genesis. In the first video we saw how chapters 1 through 11 set up
0:08
the basic storyline of the Bible. God has created all things and he makes humans
0:13
in His image to rule the world on his behalf. The humans choose sin and
0:18
rebellion and so the world spins out of control into violence and death all
0:22
leading up to the rebellion and scattering of the people in Babylon.
0:26
And so the big question is what is God going to do to rescue and redeem his world?
0:31
Well out of that scattering at Babylon, the author traces the genealogy of just one
0:36
family that leads eventually to a man named Abram, later known as Abraham.
0:42
And God’s promise to Abraham at the beginning of chapter 12 opens up a whole
0:46
new movement in the story. God calls Abraham to leave his home and go to the
0:49
land of Canaan which God says will become his one day. And in that land, God
0:54
promises to make Abraham into a great nation, to make his name great and bless him.
0:59
Now these promises are connected back to earlier parts of the book.
1:03
So Babylon had arrogantly tried to make a great name for itself and that didn’t go
1:09
very well. But God in his generosity is going to bestow a great name on this
1:14
no-name guy, Abraham, and God’s blessing of Abraham echoes all the way back to
1:20
that original blessing God gave humanity in the beginning. So the question is: “Why
1:24
is God going to blessed Abraham and his family?” And the last line of God’s
1:29
promise makes this clear: “So that all the families of the earth will find God’s
1:34
blessing in you.” Now this is key for understanding the whole rest of the
1:38
biblical story. God’s plan is to rescue and bless his rebellious world through
1:43
Abraham’s family and this is why the whole rest of the Old Testament story is
1:48
just going to focus on this one family,
1:50
eventually called the people of Israel. This is also why Israel will
1:54
later be called a kingdom of priests at Mount Sinai. God wants to use them to
1:58
show all of the other nations what he’s like and ultimately this is the promise
2:03
that gets picked up by the later biblical prophets and poets who say that
2:07
its fulfillment will come through Israel’s messianic king,
2:10
whose reign will bring justice and peace to all of the nations. Now at this
2:15
point of the story, none of that is clear.
2:18
You just have to keep reading and watch the promise develop.
2:21
And so the rest of the book focuses on Abraham and his family. First Abraham
2:25
himself, then his son Isaac and then his son Jacob and then Jacob’s twelve sons.
2:31
And the stories about each generation, they’re united by two main themes.
2:35
So first, each generation of Abraham’s family is marked by repeated failure.
2:40
They just keep making really bad decisions that mess up their lives and
2:44
put God’s promise in jeopardy.
2:46
However God remains faithful to them. He keeps rescuing them from themselves and
2:52
reaffirming his commitment to bless them and bless the nations through them
2:56
despite their failings. So the Abraham stories – God had promised Abraham huge
3:01
family – but on two different occasions he’s afraid for his life because other
3:05
men are attracted to his wife and so he denies that he’s even married to her,
3:09
which creates, of course, all of these problems. And not only that, Abraham and
3:14
his wife Sarah they can’t have children and so Sarah arranges for Abraham to
3:18
sleep with one of their servant girls, which also creates all of these problems
3:22
in the family. But each time God bales Abraham out and in chapters 15 and 17 God
3:28
even formalizes his promise to Abraham with an official commitment called
3:32
a covenant. This is a classic scene. God invites Abraham to look up at the night
3:37
stars and to count them and he says that’s how numerous your family’s going to be.
3:42
And despite all of the odds – having no kids and no way to have any at the
3:46
moment, Abraham looks up in the sky and simply trusts God’s promise. And God
3:52
responds by entering into a covenant with Abraham, promising that he will
3:57
become a father of many nations, that God’s blessing may come to the whole world.
4:02
And then God asked Abraham to mark his family with a sign of the covenant:
4:06
circumcision of all the male boys in the family. This is a symbol to remind them
4:11
that the fruitfulness of their family is a gift from God. And so Abraham has lots
4:17
of kids eventually and he dies at a good old age.
4:20
Now the Jacob stories play out these themes even more dramatically. From birth,
4:24
Jacob lives up to the meaning of his name, which is “deceiver”. He cheats his
4:28
brother Esau out of his inheritance and blessing and he does it by deceiving his old
4:33
blind father no less, and then he just takes off. He goes on to take four
4:38
wives even though he really only loves one, Rachel and this creates all of these
4:43
rivalries in the family.
4:45
The only thing that humbles Jacob is being deceived by his uncle Laban, who
4:51
cheats him out of years of his life.
4:53
The tables have finally turned. And so it’s a humbled Jacob that returns to his homeland.
4:58
In a very strange story Jacob ends up wrestling with God as he demands that
5:05
God bless him. Some things never really change, do they? However, God honors his
5:10
determination and he passes Abraham’s blessing on to him and he renamed Jacob
5:15
as Israel, which means “wrestles with God.” Now it’s this last part of the book the
5:21
story of Jacob sons where all the themes come to a head. Jacob loves his second to
5:26
youngest son Joseph more than any of the others and he gives him a special jacket.
5:30
And the 10 older sons come to hate Joseph and so they kidnap him and
5:34
they plan to kill him, but instead they decide to just sell him into slavery in
5:39
Egypt where he ends up in prison. Talk about family failure. But God is with
5:45
Joseph and He orchestrates Joseph’s release from prison and Pharaoh ends up
5:50
elevating Joseph to second in command over all of Egypt. And so Joseph saves
5:55
the nation of Egypt during a famine and he also ends up saving his brothers and
5:59
his family from starving to death. And so once again we can see the folly and the
6:04
sin of Abraham’s family is met with God’s faithfulness, who subverts even the
6:10
evil of the brothers into an occasion to save life. And this is actually what
6:15
Joseph says right near the end of the book. He says to his brother’s, “You planned
6:19
this for evil but God planned it for good, to save many lives.” Now these words
6:26
are strategically placed at the end of the book because they summarize not only
6:30
the story of Joseph and his brothers, but the book as a whole.
6:33
From Genesis 3 onward, humans keep acting selfishly and doing evil but
6:39
this God does not going to leave his world to its own devices. He remains
6:43
faithful and determined to bless people despite their failures. You can see this
6:48
especially in how that mysterious promise about the descendant of the
6:51
woman gets developed throughout the book. So remember Genesis 3? God promised
6:56
that this wounded Victor would come and crush the snake and defeat evil at its source.
7:01
And the author then connects this promise directly to the line of Abraham.
7:06
This is a part of how God’s gonna bring his blessing to the nations. Now from
7:11
Abraham this promise gets connected to Judah, the fourth son of Jacob. And this is how.
7:16
In an extremely important poem in chapter 49, an aging Jacob, he’s on his
7:22
deathbed, he wants to bless his twelve sons and when he comes to Judah, Jacob
7:27
predicts that Judah will become the tribe of Israel’s royal leaders and that
7:31
one day a king will come who will command the obedience of all the nations
7:36
and fulfill God’s promise to restore the garden blessing to all of the world.
7:41
And then after this Jacob dies and later Joseph dies too. So the growing family
7:47
remains in Egypt and so the book of Genesis ends with all of these future
7:53
hopes and promises left hanging and undeveloped. And it forces you to turn
7:57
the page to see how it’s all going to turn out. But for now that’s the book of Genesis.
Christy

The Book of Genesis Ch. 1-11 Explained with Illustrations by The Bible Project

You’re probably familiar with at least some of the contents of the Book of Genesis, but do you know how each of the parts relate to the overall scheme of what God is doing in the world? Most of us have a difficult time seeing the big picture of things happening in the Bible.

Fortunately, the guys at The Bible Project have put together a great explanation of Genesis. And it includes an illustrated chart!

 

 

 

Download a Free Digital Copy of the Poster from the Video

These illustrated charts are so helpful, I encourage you to download a copy for personal study. It’s free! Courtesy of The Bible Project.

[button link=”https://thebibleproject.com/product/genesis-poster/” color=”purple” newwindow=”yes”] Genesis Poster[/button]

 

Video Transcript

0:03
The book of Genesis is the first book of the Bible and it’s storyline divides into two main parts
0:09
There’s chapters 1-11, which tell the story of God and the whole world, and then there’s chapters 12-50
0:15
which zoom in and tell the story of God and just one man, Abraham, and then his family.
0:20
And these two parts are connected by a hinge story at the beginning of chapter 12.
0:25
And this design, it gives us a clue as to how to understand the message of the book as a whole and how it
0:30
introduces the story of the whole Bible. So the book begins with God taking the disorder and the
0:36
darkness described in the second sentence of the Bible and God brings out of it order and beauty and
0:42
goodness and he makes out of it a world where life can flourish. And God makes these creatures called humans
0:48
or “adam,” in Hebrew. He makes them in his image, which has to do with their role and purpose in God’s world.
0:56
So humans are made to be reflections of God’s character out into the world.
1:01
And they’re appointed as God’s representatives to rule his world on his behalf, which in context
1:07
means to harness all its potential, to care for it, and make it where even more life can flourish.
1:14
God blesses the humans. It’s a key word in this book. And he gives them a garden, a place from which they
1:20
begin starting to build this new world. Now the key is that the humans have a choice about how they’re
1:26
going to go about building this world and that’s represented by the tree of the knowledge of good and evil.
1:31
Up till now, God has provided and defined what is good and what is not good. But now God is giving humans the
1:38
dignity and the freedom of a choice: Are they going to trust God’s definition of good and evil or are they
1:44
going to seize autonomy and define good and evil for themselves? And the stakes are really high.
1:49
To rebel against God is to embrace death because you’re turning away from the giver of life himself.
1:56
This is represented by the Tree of Life. And so in chapter 3, a mysterious figure, a snake, enters into the story.
2:03
The snake’s given no introduction other than it’s a creature that God made.
2:08
And it becomes clear that it’s a creature in rebellion against God and it wants to lead the humans into rebellion and their death.
2:15
The snake tells a different story about the tree and the choice.
2:19
It says that seizing the knowledge of good and evil are not going to bring death and that it’s actually the
2:25
way to life and becoming like God themselves. Now the irony of this is tragic because we know the humans
2:31
are already like God–they were made to reflect God’s image. But instead of trusting God, the humans seize autonomy,
2:38
they take the knowledge of good and evil for themselves, and in an instant the whole story
2:44
spirals out of control. The first casualty is human relationships. The man and the woman
2:49
they suddenly realize how vulnerable they are. Now they can’t even trust each other. And so they make clothes
2:54
and they hide their bodies from one another. The second casualty is that intimacy between God and humans is
3:01
lost. So they go, run, and hide from God. And then when God finds them, they start this game of
3:07
blame-shifting about who rebelled first. Now right here this story stops and there’s a series of short poems
3:13
where God declares to the snake, and then to the humans, the tragic consequences of their actions.
3:19
God first tells the snake that despite it’s apparent victory, it is destined for defeat, to eat dust.
3:26
God promises that one day a seed, or a descendant, will come from the woman, who’s going to deliver a lethal strike to the snakes head.
3:35
Which sounds like great news, but this victory is going to come with a cost because the snake, too,
3:40
will deliver a lethal strike to the descendant’s heal as it’s being crushed.
3:45
It’s a very mysterious promise of this wounded victor. But in the flow of the story so far, you see that
3:52
this is an act of God’s grace. The humans, they’ve just rebelled. And what does God do?
3:56
He promises to rescue them. But this doesn’t erase the consequences of the humans’ decision.
4:02
So God informs them that now every aspect of their life together–at home, in the field–it’s going to be
4:09
fraught with grief and pain because of the rebellion, all leading to their death.
4:15
From here, the story then spirals downward. Chapters 3-11, they trace the widening ripple effect
4:21
of the rebellion and of human relationships fracturing at every level.
4:26
So there’s the story of two brothers, Cain and Abel. Cain is so jealous of his brother that he wants to murder him.
4:32
And God warns him not to give in to the temptation but he does anyway. He murders him in the field.
4:37
So Cain then goes on to build a city where violence and oppression reign. And this is all epitomized in this story
4:44
of Lamech. He’s the first man in the Bible to have more than one wife. He’s accumulating them like property.
4:50
And then he goes on to sing a short song about how he’s more violent and vengeful than Cain ever was.
4:57
After this we get an odd story about the “sons of God, ” which could refer to evil, angelic beings,
5:04
or it could refer to ancient kings who claimed that they descended from the gods.
5:10
And like Lamech, they acquired as many wives as they wanted and they produced the Nephilim, these great warriors of old.
5:17
Whichever view is right, the point is that humans are building kingdoms that fill God’s world with violence and even more corruption.
5:25
In response, we are told that God is broken with grief, humanity is ruining his good world and they’re ruining each other.
5:32
And so out of a passion to protect the goodness of his world, he washes it clean of humanity’s evil with a great flood.
5:39
But he protects one blameless human–Noah, and his family. And he commissions him as a new Adam.
5:46
He repeats the divine blessing and commissions him to go out into the world. And so our hopes are really high
5:52
but then Noah fails too. and also in a garden. He goes and he plants a vineyard and he gets drunk out of his mind.
5:59
And then one of his sons, Ham, does something shameful to his father in the tent. And so, here we have our new “adam,” naked and ashamed,
6:08
just like the first. And the downward spiral begins again. It all leads to the foundation of the city of Babylon.
6:15
The people of ancient Mesopotamia, they come together around this new technology they have–the brick.
6:21
And they can make cities and towers bigger and faster than anybody’s ever done before. And they want to build
6:26
a new kind of tower that will reach up to the gods and they will make a great name for themselves.
6:32
It’s an image of human rebellion and arrogance. It’s the garden rebellion now writ large.
6:39
And so God humbles their pride and scatters them. Now this is a diverse group of stories but you can see
6:47
they’re all exploring the same basic point: God keeps giving humans the chance to do the right thing
6:54
with his world and humans keep ruining it. These stories are making a claim that we live in a good world that we have turned bad–
7:03
that we’ve all chosen to define good and evil for ourselves and so we all contribute
7:08
to this world of broken relationships, leading to conflict, and violence, and ultimately death.
7:15
But there’s hope. God promised that one day a descendant would come–
7:20
the wounded victor who will defeat evil at its source. And so despite humanity’s evil, God is determined to bless and rescue his world.
7:29
And so the big question is, of course, “What is God going to do?” And the next story, the hinge, offers the answer.
7:36
But for now, that’s what Genesis 1-11 is all about.
Christy

The Parable of the Unmerciful Servant

Jesus told a parable or story of an unmerciful servant. This servant refused to forgive, even after being forgiven much. It’s a good reminder to all of us. After all Jesus has forgiven us, we can surely forgive the offenses of others.

 

Read this parable and then watch the fun video below.

 

Then Peter came and said to him, “Lord, how often shall my brother sin against me, and I forgive him? Until seven times?”22 Jesus said to him, “I don’t tell you until seven times, but, until seventy times seven. 23 Therefore the Kingdom of Heaven is like a certain king, who wanted to reconcile accounts with his servants. 24 When he had begun to reconcile, one was brought to him who owed him ten thousand talents. 25 But because he couldn’t pay, his lord commanded him to be sold, with his wife, his children, and all that he had, and payment to be made. 26 The servant therefore fell down and knelt before him, saying, ‘Lord, have patience with me, and I will repay you all!’ 27 The lord of that servant, being moved with compassion, released him, and forgave him the debt.

28 “But that servant went out, and found one of his fellow servants, who owed him one hundred denarii, and he grabbed him, and took him by the throat, saying, ‘Pay me what you owe!’

29 “So his fellow servant fell down at his feet and begged him, saying, ‘Have patience with me, and I will repay you!’ 30 He would not, but went and cast him into prison, until he should pay back that which was due. 31 So when his fellow servants saw what was done, they were exceedingly sorry, and came and told to their lord all that was done. 32 Then his lord called him in, and said to him, ‘You wicked servant! I forgave you all that debt, because you begged me. 33 Shouldn’t you also have had mercy on your fellow servant, even as I had mercy on you?’ 34 His lord was angry, and delivered him to the tormentors, until he should pay all that was due to him. 35 So my heavenly Father will also do to you, if you don’t each forgive your brother from your hearts for his misdeeds.”

Matthew 18:21-35

 

 

 

 

 

Christy

The Gospel of Matthew (Chapters 14-28) Explained with Illustrations by The Bible Project

In the first half of the Gospel of Matthew, Jesus announced the arrival of God’s Kingdom and He began to bring the Kingdom into people’s lives as He interacted with individuals.

The second half of the Gospel of Matthew shows the opposing expectations about what the Messiah would be and the conflict escalates into a clash of kingdoms leading to the death of Jesus. His followers had their hopes dashed, because they believed the Messiah had been killed or He wasn’t the Messiah after all.

Like all good stories, this one has a surprise ending. Jesus was raised from the dead, appeared to numerous people, and gave one last message of hope to His followers: I will always be with you.

Follow along with this marvelous video from The Bible Project as it explains the second half of Matthew in greater detail.

To download a free copy of the illustrated diagram used in the video, visit The Bible Project:

https://thebibleproject.com/product/matthew-poster/

 

Video Transcript

0:02
The Gospel according to Matthew. In the first video we saw how Matthew introduced
0:06
Jesus as the Messiah from the line of David, and as a new authoritative teacher
0:11
like Moses, and also as Emmanuel which in Hebrew means “God with us.” After Jesus
0:17
announced and taught about the arrival of God’s kingdom and after he brought the
0:21
kingdom into day-to-day life among the people of Israel, we saw that Jesus was
0:25
accepted by many but rejected by others, especially Israel’s religious leaders,
0:30
the Pharisees. And so the big question is, “How is this conflict between Jesus and
0:35
Israel’s leaders going to play itself out?” The next large section, chapters 14
0:40
through 20, explore all the different expectations people have about the
0:44
Messiah. Jesus keeps healing sick people and twice he even miraculously provides
0:50
food for these huge crowds in the desert, one made up of Jewish people and the
0:54
other is a non-jewish crowd. And this sign is very similar to what Moses did
0:59
for Israel in the wilderness. And so are these people are excited about Jesus,
1:04
they think he’s the great prophet and the Messiah, but not the religious leaders.
1:08
Their view of the Messiah is built on passages like Psalm 2 or Daniel chapter 2,
1:14
about a victorious Messiah who is going to deliver Israel and defeat the pagan
1:18
oppressors. And from their point of view, Jesus is a false teacher. He’s making
1:23
blasphemous claims about himself and so there are stories here about them
1:27
increasing their opposition, hatching a plan to kill him. And so in response,
1:31
Jesus, he withdraws. And he begins teaching his closest disciples what it means for
1:36
him to be Israel’s Messiah because it is not what anybody expects. So Jesus asked
1:42
his disciples– chapter 16– he says, “Who do you all say that I am?” And Peter comes up
1:47
with the right answer, it seems. He says, “You are the Messiah, the Son of the living God.”
1:50
But then it becomes clear that Peter’s thinking about a king who’s going to
1:55
reign victoriously through military power. And Jesus challenges Peter, saying that
2:00
“Yes, I am going to become king, but through a different way.” And so Jesus
2:05
starts to teach on themes from the prophet Isaiah who said that the
2:09
Messianic King would suffer and die for the sins of his own people. And so Jesus,
2:16
he was positioning himself as a Messianic king who reigns by becoming a
2:21
servant and who would lay down his life for Israel and the nations. Peter and
2:27
the disciples, they mostly just don’t get it. And so Jesus enters into the fourth
2:31
block of teaching followed by a series of teachings after that. And these are
2:35
all about the upside down nature of Jesus’ Messianic Kingdom–which turns
2:40
upside down all of our value systems. So in the community of the servant king you
2:45
gain honor by serving others and instead of getting revenge, you forgive and do
2:52
good to your enemies. And in Jesus’ kingdom you gain true wealth by giving
2:57
your wealth away to the poor. To follow the servant Messiah, you must become a
3:01
servant yourself. In the next section we watched the two kingdoms clash–Jesus’
3:07
kingdom and that of Israel’s leader. Jesus comes to Jerusalem for Passover
3:11
riding in on a donkey and the crowds are hailing him as the Messiah. Jesus
3:15
immediately marches into the courtyard of the temple and he creates this huge
3:20
disruption that brings the daily sacrifices to a halt. His actions speak
3:25
louder than words here. As Israel’s King, Jesus was asserting his royal authority
3:30
over the temple, the place where God and Israel met together. And in Jesus’ view, the
3:36
temple was compromised by the hypocrisy of Israel’s leaders and so here he’s
3:40
challenging their authority and naturally they’re deeply offended. And so
3:44
they try to trap Jesus and shame him in public debate and they fail. So they end
3:49
up just determining to have him killed. In response, Jesus delivers his final
3:53
block of teaching. He first offers this passionate critique of the Pharisees
3:57
and their hypocrisy. And then he weeps over Jerusalem and its rejection of God
4:03
and His Kingdom. Then Jesus withdraws with the disciples and he starts telling
4:07
them what’s going to happen. He’s going to be executed by these leaders, but in
4:12
doing so they’re going to create their own demise because instead of accepting
4:16
Jesus’ way of the Peaceful Kingdom they’re going to take the road of revolt
4:20
against
4:21
Rome and so Jerusalem and its temple are going to be destroyed. But Jesus says
4:26
that is not the end of the story.
4:28
He’s going to be vindicated after his death by his resurrection and one day
4:32
he’ll return and set up his kingdom over all nations. And so in the meanwhile, the
4:37
disciples need to stay alert and stay committed to just announcing Jesus and
4:42
His Kingdom and spreading the good news. And so with all of that ringing in the
4:46
disciples ears, the story comes to its climax. That night Jesus takes the
4:51
disciples aside and he celebrates the Passover meal with them.
4:55
Passover retells the story of Israel’s rescue from slavery through the death of
4:59
the Passover lamb. And then Jesus takes the bread and the wine from this meal as
5:04
new symbols showing that his coming death would be a sacrifice that would
5:09
redeem his people from slavery to sin and evil. After the meal, Jesus is arrested,
5:15
he’s put on trial before the Sanhedrin, the Council of Jewish leaders. And they
5:20
reject his claim to be the Messiah. They charge him with blasphemy against
5:23
God. Then Jesus is brought before the Roman governor, Pilate, and he thinks
5:28
Jesus is innocent, but he gives in to the pressure from the Jewish leaders and he
5:33
sentences Jesus to death by crucifixion. So Jesus is led away by Roman soldiers and
5:38
then crucified. Now you’ll notice right here in this section that, just like
5:43
Matthew did in the opening chapters, he increases the number of references to
5:47
the Old Testament. He’s trying to show that Jesus’ death was not a tragedy or
5:52
failure. Rather, it was the surprising fulfillment of all of the old, prophetic
5:57
promises. Jesus came as the Servant Messiah spoken of by Isaiah. He was
6:03
rejected by his own people but instead of judging them, he is judged on their
6:08
behalf,
6:09
bearing the consequences of their sin. So the crucifixion scene, it comes to a
6:14
close, and Jesus’ body is placed in a tomb. But the book ends with a surprising
6:19
twist–the last chapter. The disciples, they discover on Sunday morning that
6:23
Jesus’ tomb is empty. And then all of a sudden people start seeing Jesus alive
6:29
from the dead. And the book concludes
6:32
with the risen Jesus giving a final teaching called the Great Commission.
6:35
Jesus says that he is now the true king of the world and so he sends his
6:41
disciples out to all nations with the good news that Jesus is Lord and that
6:46
anyone can join his kingdom by being baptized and by following his teachings.
6:50
And echoing all the way back to his name, Emmanuel, God with us, from chapter one,
6:55
Jesus’ last words in the book to his disciples are “I will be with you.” It’s a
7:00
promise of Jesus’ presence until the day he finally returns. And that’s the Gospel
7:06
according to Matthew.

Christy

The Gospel of Matthew (Chapters 1-13) Explained with Illustrations by The Bible Project

Have you ever looked at a typical outline of a book of the Bible? Did it mean much to you? Outlines may contain valuable information, but it’s not in a form accessible to most people. It’s not the way we think. Charts tend to be much clearer because the visual structure and the relationship between ideas is easily understood and remembered.

A step up from either of those is an illustrated chart with drawings that visually describe the contents of the book. That’s what you’ll find in this video by The Bible Project. It does a remarkable job of visually explaining the structure of the Gospel of Matthew. Take a look and learn.

 

To download a free copy of the illustrated diagram used in the video, visit The Bible Project:

https://thebibleproject.com/product/matthew-poster/

 

Video Transcript

0:02
The Gospel according to Matthew. It’s one of the earliest official accounts about
0:06
Jesus of Nazareth–his life, his death and his resurrection. The book itself is
0:10
anonymous but the earliest reliable tradition links it to Matthew the tax
0:15
collector who was one of the twelve apostles that Jesus appointed and he
0:18
actually appears within the book itself. For about thirty to forty years the
0:23
apostles orally taught and passed on their eyewitness account about Jesus,
0:27
along with his teachings that they had all memorized. And Matthew has then
0:31
collected and arranged all these into this amazing tapestry and designed the
0:36
book to highlight certain themes about Jesus. In this video we’re just going to cover the first
0:41
half of the book. Specifically, Matthew wants to show how Jesus is the
0:44
continuation and fulfillment of the whole biblical story about God and
0:48
Israel–that Jesus is the Messiah from the line of David, that he is a new
0:53
authoritative teacher like Moses, and not only that, Jesus is God with us or, in
0:59
Hebrew, Emmanuel. And Matthew has designed this book with an introduction and
1:04
conclusion and these act like a frame around five clear sections right here in
1:09
the center, each of which concludes with a long block of Jesus’s teaching. Now
1:14
this design is very intentional and it’s amazing. Just watch how this works.
1:19
Chapters 1 through 3, they set the stage by attaching Jesus’ story right onto the
1:24
storyline of the Old Testament Scriptures. So Matthew opens with the
1:27
genealogy about Jesus that highlights how he is from the messianic line of the son of
1:32
David and he is a son of Abraham. That means he’s going to bring God’s blessing
1:37
to all of the nations. After that we get the famous story about Jesus’ birth and
1:41
how all of the events fulfilled the Old Testament prophetic promises that the
1:46
nations would come and honor the Messiah, that the Messiah would be born in Bethlehem,
1:50
but even more than that, Jesus’ conception by the Holy Spirit, his name Emmanuel, all
1:55
these work together to show that Jesus is no mere human. He is God with us; God
2:01
become human.
2:04
So you can see two of Matthew’s key themes right here in the introduction. He’s
2:08
from the line of David, he’s Emmanuel. But Matthew also wants to show how Jesus is
2:13
a new Moses. So, like Moses, Jesus came up out of Egypt, he passed through the
2:19
waters of baptism, and he entered into the wilderness for forty days. And then
2:25
Jesus goes up onto a mountain to deliver his new teaching. So through all of this
2:29
Matthew is claiming that Jesus is the promised “greater than Moses” figure who’s
2:34
going to deliver Israel from slavery, he’s going to give them new, divine
2:38
teaching, he’s going to save them from their sins, and bring about a new
2:41
covenant relationship between God and His people.
2:45
This Moses and Jesus parallel also explains why Matthew has structured the
2:50
center of the book the way that he did. These five main parts highlight Jesus as
2:56
a teacher. And he’s created a parallel. Jesus as a teacher parallels the five
3:01
books of Moses. Jesus is the new authoritative covenant teacher who’s
3:06
going to fulfill the storyline of the Torah. Now in the first section, chapters 4 to 7, Jesus
3:11
steps onto the scene announcing the arrival of God’s kingdom. And this is
3:15
really key. The kingdom is in essence about God’s rescue operation for his
3:20
whole world and it’s taking place through King Jesus. Jesus has come to
3:25
confront evil, especially spiritual evil and its whole legacy of demon oppression
3:30
and disease and death. Jesus has come to restore God’s rule and reign over the
3:35
whole world by creating a new family of people who will follow him,
3:40
obey His teachings, and live under his rule. So after Jesus begins healing
3:45
people and forming a movement, a community, he takes his followers out to a mountain
3:50
or a hillside, and he delivers his first big block of teaching, traditionally called
3:55
the Sermon on the Mount. And here Jesus explores what it looks like to follow
3:59
him and live in God’s kingdom. And its an upside-down Kingdom where there are no
4:04
privileged members. So the poor, the nobody’s, the wealthy, the religious–
4:08
everybody is invited and is called to turn, to repent, and to follow Jesus and
4:14
join his family. Jesus says that he’s not here to set aside the commands of the
4:18
Torah or the Old Testament. Rather, he’s here to fulfill all of that through
4:23
his life, through his teachings. He’s here to transform the hearts of his people so
4:29
that they can truly love God and love their neighbor, including their enemy.
4:33
After concluding his great teaching on the kingdom, the next section shows Jesus
4:37
bringing the kingdom into reality in the day-to-day lives of people. So Matthew’s
4:41
arranged here nine stories about Jesus bringing the power of God’s kingdom into
4:47
the lives of hurting, broken people. There are three groups of three stories
4:52
and they’re all about people who are sick or have broken bodies or they’re in
4:56
danger and Jesus heals or saves them by these acts of grace and power. And then
5:01
right in between these triads we find two parallel stories about Jesus’ call
5:07
that people should follow him.
5:09
Matthew is making a point here. One can only experience the power of Jesus’ grace
5:15
by following him and becoming his disciple. Now after Matthew has shown the
5:20
power of the kingdom through Jesus, Jesus then extends his reach by sending out the
5:25
12 disciples, who are going to go do what he’s been doing, and this leads to the
5:29
second large block of teaching, chapter 10. And here Jesus teaches his disciples
5:34
how to announce the kingdom and what to expect once they do. Many among Israel
5:39
are accepting Jesus and his offer of the kingdom but Israel’s leaders, they aren’t.
5:44
They stand to lose a lot if they repent and become disciples of Jesus and so
5:48
jesus knows they’re going to reject him and persecute his followers, which is
5:52
exactly what happens. In the next section, chapters 11 through 13, Matthew has
5:56
collected a group of stories about how people are responding to Jesus and His
6:01
message and it’s a mixed bag. So some stories are positive– people love Jesus
6:05
and they think he’s the messiah. Others are more neutral, like John the Baptist
6:10
or even the members of Jesus’ own family. And they make it clear that Jesus
6:14
is not what they expected. And then you have Israel’s leaders. They’re entirely
6:18
negative. You have the Pharisees and the Bible scholars. They all reject Jesus
6:22
together. They think he’s a false teacher, he’s leading the people astray, they think
6:27
he’s blasphemous in these exalted claims he’s making about himself.
6:31
But Jesus isn’t surprised or thrown by all these diverse responses. In fact, he
6:36
focuses on it in the third block of teaching, chapter 13. Here Matthew has
6:41
collected together a bunch of Jesus’ parables about the kingdom, like about a
6:45
farmer throwing seed on four types of soil or about a mustard seed or a pearl or
6:51
buried treasure. These parables are like a commentary on the stories that you’ve
6:56
just read in chapters 11 and 12. Some people are accepting Jesus with
7:01
enthusiasm, others are rejecting him. But God’s kingdom is of ultimate value and it
7:06
will not stop spreading despite all of these obstacles. So that’s the first half
7:12
of the Gospel according to Matthew. Now, here’s a few more things to look for as
7:15
you read through these chapters. Matthew’s presenting Jesus, remember, as the
7:19
continuation and fulfillment of the Old Testament story line. So look for how he
7:24
weaves in quotations from the Old Testament Scriptures and what you’ll
7:27
find is that they’re placed at strategic points in the story, explaining more
7:32
about Jesus and his identity. So stop, take time to go look up these references
7:36
and read them in their Old Testament context and most often you’ll discover
7:39
really cool, interesting connections. Lastly, pay attention to the types of
7:44
people who accept Jesus and follow him. And you’ll see that it’s most often
7:49
people who are unimportant, they’re nobody’s, or their irreligious. And these
7:54
are the people who are transformed by their trust or faith in Jesus and follow
7:59
him. And it’s the religious and the prideful who are offended by him. So how
8:04
is this tension between Jesus and Israel’s leaders going to play itself
8:07
out?
8:08
That’s what the second half of Matthew is all about.

Christy

The Old Testament Told in Only 5 Minutes

The Old Testament can seem overwhelming. While there are great narrative sections, there are also long sections of laws and prophecies that slow things down. The Old Testament isn’t printed in chronological order, either, so it’s difficult to understand how things fit together.

In five short minutes, this video gives an overview of the entire Old Testament. It follows the main thread of events that ties everything else together. If you understand this main storyline of biblical history, you will be able to piece together other parts into the picture.

The video covers a lot of ground quickly so you might want to watch it twice if you’re not familiar with the content.

 

 

 

 

Christy

The Gospel of The Kingdom

What is the “Gospel” or “Good News” the Bible talks about? And why is it associated with references to a “kingdom”? If you’ve ever wondered these things, take a look at this short video by The Bible Project.

The Good News of the Kingdom of God is a central theme throughout the Bible and it is a key to understanding the role of Christ then and now.

The guys at The Bible Project explain, “In Isaiah 52 a messenger comes to tell the good news that God still reigns and that he is coming to bring his reign to earth. This video explores how Jesus saw himself as that messenger and as the King.”

This is so important you might want to watch it a couple times.

 

 

 

 

Video Transcript

0:01
There’s this beautiful poem. It’s in the book of Isaiah. The city of Jerusalem has
0:07
just been destroyed by Babylon, a great kingdom in the north, and all of these
0:11
Jewish people, they’ve been sent away into exile, but a few remained in the
0:15
city. And they are left wondering: “What just happened? Has our God abandoned us?”
0:21
Right, because Jerusalem was supposed to be the city where God would reign over
0:26
the world to bring peace and blessing to everyone. Now Isaiah had been saying
0:30
that Jerusalem’s destruction was a mess of Israel’s own making. They had turned away
0:35
from their God, become corrupt, and so their city and their temple were
0:39
destroyed. Everything seems lost. But the poem goes on. There is a watchman on the city
0:45
walls and far out on the hills we see a messenger, and he’s running towards the
0:49
city. He’s running and shouting “Good news!” and Isaiah says: “How beautiful upon the
0:55
mountains are the feet of those who bring good news.”
0:59
Beautiful feet? Yes, the feet are beautiful because they’re carrying a beautiful
1:03
message. What’s the message? That despite Jerusalem’s destruction, Israel’s God
1:08
still reigns as King. And that God Himself is going to, one day, return to
1:13
this city, take up his throne and bring peace. And the Watchmen sing for joy
1:18
because of the good news that their God still reigns. Now in the New Testament we
1:24
find this same phrase “the good news”. It’s the Greek word Euangelion and it’s
1:29
also sometimes translated with the word “Gospel”. Yeah, so when Christians say, “Do you
1:33
believe the gospel?” they mean “Do you believe the news?” But not just any news.
1:38
In the Bible, this phrase is always about the announcement of the reign of a new
1:42
king and in the New Testament, the Gospels use this phrase to summarize all of
1:46
Jesus’s teachings. They say that he went about proclaiming the good news of God’s
1:52
kingdom. So Jesus saw himself as the messenger, bringing the news that God
1:56
reigns. Yes, but the way that he described God’s reign
1:59
surprised everybody. I mean, think, powerful successful Kingdom. It needs to
2:04
be strong, able to impose its will, able to defeat its enemies, but Jesus said the greatest
2:11
person in God’s kingdom was the weakest. The one who loves and who serves the
2:16
poor. And he said that you live under God’s reign when you respond to evil by
2:22
loving your enemies and forgiving them and seeking peace. This is an upside down
2:28
Kingdom. Now Jesus also said that this kingdom was arriving with him. Yes, so for
2:35
example, there is this really interesting story where there’s a high-ranking Roman
2:39
officer and he comes to Jesus begging him to heal his servant and he even
2:43
calls Jesus his Lord acknowledging that Jesus is his authority. Jesus praises this
2:49
man for recognizing what no one else yet had, that not only was Jesus
2:54
announcing God’s kingdom. He was the King. And so, the word gets out that this Jewish man
3:00
from Galilee is talking and acting like he’s the king of Israel. He’s appointing
3:04
twelve disciples which are an image of Israel’s twelve tribes. He’s healing people,
3:09
forgiving people their sins. And all of this so
3:13
threatened israel’s leaders that they finally decided to have him killed.
3:18
And Jesus let them. Which is a weird thing to do if you’re trying to become king.
3:24
That’s right, but for Jesus this is what had to happen.
3:29
Jesus saw the sin and the devastation of His people of Israel as just one small part of the entire human condition.
3:37
How all humanity has rebelled against God resulting in the tragedy and devastation
3:43
of our whole world. So how is God going to bring his reign over such a world? Jesus
3:50
believed it would be through an act of sacrificial love for his enemies.
3:56
This is why in the Gospels Jesus’ crucifixion is depicted as his
4:00
enthronement as the King of the Jews.
4:03
He receives a crown. He also receives a robe. He is exalted up not on to a throne, but
4:10
onto the cross. “How beautiful are the feet that bring good news”. And the good news
4:17
now is that Jesus has defeated death and that he reigns as King. That he’s dealt
4:22
with our sin and corruption himself and that he’s conquered it with his life and
4:27
with his love. And then Jesus sends his followers to go out and keep announcing
4:32
this good news of the upside down kingdom. And to invite everyone to give
4:37
their allegiance to him, the king who defeated death with his love.
4:46
Thanks for watching this channel. We do this because we believe the Bible as one unified
4:51
narrative believes in Jesus, and has profound wisdom for the modern world, so we’re making
4:56
different video series. Some that walk people through the design and message of
5:01
books of the Bible or whole sections of the Bible.
5:03
We also do series that take one biblical theme and trace that to the
5:07
whole narrative part of the Bible, kinda like the one you just watched, and we have
5:10
a lot more series coming up that we have planned. The Bible Project is possible
5:14
because of your support. Some people give one time gifts and there’s a growing
5:20
number of monthly supporters as well and we’re all behind this we want to make
5:25
these videos free and available to anyone anywhere.
5:28
Yes, so you can join us, be a part of this. Go to jointhebibleproject.com. You can
5:32
give there. There is also downloadable stuff, like full res videos and
5:37
study guides, posters… It’s all for free and it’s all because of your support, so thanks a lot.
5:43
Yeah, thank you, guys.
Christy

Animated Explanation of ‘The Messiah’

You may have heard Jesus called “the Messiah” but what does that really mean? This short video walks through the Bible exploring the significance of “the Messiah” from Genesis to Revelation. I think you’ll find it helpful because it ties together the Old Testament with the New Testament. Take a look.

 

 

 

 

Video Transcript

0:00
Jon: There’s this crazy story at the beginning of the Bible we have Adam and Eve
0:03
and they in there in the Garden of Eden.
0:05
Tim: And everything in the garden is great exactly is it should be except
0:11
there’s this one tree that they’re told by God not to eat from because it’s
0:15
dangerous and it will kill them.
0:17
Jon: So that’s it, just avoid this fruit tree and we are fine?
0:20
Tim: Right, it seems pretty simple. But in this garden there’s a snake
0:24
and it starts telling a different story. It says that if you eat of this tree it is not
0:28
going to kill you
0:29
in fact it’s going to make you become like God.
0:33
Jon: And Adam and Eve, they believe the snake and the the fruit.
0:36
Tim: And because it is this the goodness of the garden is tragically lost and the evil and death
0:41
enters into God’s good world.
0:43
Jon: Now, why is there a talking snake in the garden? I mean this thing is a problem.
0:50
Tim: Yeah, it is very strange, and even more strange is the fact that the Bible doesn’t say why
0:54
or how this thing even got there. It simply presents the snake as this
0:58
creature who’s in rebellion against God and wants to get
1:01
other people to doubt God’s goodness and lead them on a path toward death.
1:05
And so whatever this snake is,
1:08
it’s the source of evil that pervades our world and our lives even still today
1:13
Jon: But there is some hope because right here in the story God makes this really
1:17
interesting promise to Adam and Eve.
1:19
Tim: That someone is going to come in the future, a son of Eve,
1:22
and this guys gonna common is gonna crash the Serpent’s head and destroy evil
1:27
at its source. However during this battle
1:30
t he serpent is going to bite this guy’s heal.
1:33
Jon: So it’s like I’m mutual destruction
1:35
Tim: Yes. It is a strange and beautiful promise and just hanging there until the next key moment in the story…
1:42
…when God singled out this guy named Abraham
1:45
and says that through his family goodness and blessing is going to be
1:49
restored back to all of the nations in the world
1:51
and as we follow this family we get to one of Abraham’s great-grandsons, this guy named Judah.
1:57
and he receives this promise that a king is going to come from his line
2:01
and that the whole world is going to follow this king, and he’s going to bring
2:04
peace and harmony and there will be lots of
2:06
food and wine and milk in vineyard and it’s going to be awesome.
2:10
Jon: The first king that we meet from the line of Judah is a guy named King David
2:15
and he’s a hero maybe he is the Snake Crusher
2:18
Tim: But it turns out that David is infected with the same evil
2:21
as the rest of humanity. He never crushes the snake
2:24
just the opposite. However God makes a promise to David that this king
2:30
is going to eventually come from his line. But as you go on in the story
2:35
one by one each generation of his sons they’re just total
2:39
chumps they give in to the snake, they choose evil
2:43
they go after money and sex and power and following other gods.
2:47
Jon: Things get so bad that they run the nation of Israel
2:49
right into the ground and the big bad Empire of Babylon just takes them out.
2:54
Tim: So now there are no more Kings to even fulfill this promise.
2:58
Jon: So seems like the whole plan is lost.
3:00
Tim: But during these dark days there’s these crazy group of guys called Prophets
3:04
and they kept talking about this coming King and reminding us of the
3:09
promise that he’ll come he will defeat evil
3:12
and restore the garden. Now one specific profit Isaiah –
3:16
he tells us more about why this King is bitten
3:20
Isaiah says that the promised King receives this wound
3:23
because of humanity’s evil, and that it kills him.
3:27
But then all of a sudden he comes back and Isaiah says that is because he suffered this wound
3:32
that he can now become a source of healing to other people.
3:35
Jon: But the Old Testament ends and the snake crushing King that everyone’s been
3:39
talking about never shows up.
3:41
Tim: And that is why when the New Testament begins it introduces us to
3:45
Jesus of Nazareth
3:46
not as some random guy but as someone who comes to fulfill these specific ancient promises.
3:52
Jon: Yeah, we learn that he’s from the line of David, Judah, and Abraham.
3:57
Tim: And he goes around Israel announcing
3:59
that the goodness of God’s kingdom is here now and he begins
4:02
confronting the affects of evil on people by healing them by forgiving them of their sins and evil
4:08
Jon: Many people are now believing that this is in fact the promised King
4:12
Tim: Bit Jesus began telling his closest followers
4:15
that he was going to become king and bring peace
4:18
by taking the full effect if humanity’s evil into himself.
4:21
Jon: That fatal snake bite wound.
4:24
Tim: And so it seems like the serpent wins
4:28
and this story actually would be a tragedy except for what happens next.
4:32
Jesus rises from the dead.
4:36
Jon: A nd now Jesus has the power over evil and death for himself.
4:40
Tim: So the rest at the New Testament is then making this claim
4:43
the Jesus’ power over evil and death has now become available
4:47
to us to begin confronting the effects evil in our own lives.
4:51
Jon: But even still, death and evil are a real problem in our world all around us.
4:57
Tim: And so the story of the Bible ends
4:59
by describing this future day when Jesus comes back
5:02
and he finishes the job. He destroys the snake once and for all, and he restores
5:07
the goodness at the garden here on earth
Christy

What Is the Bible?

Jon Collins and Tim Mackie of The Bible Project are using their skills for God by putting together enjoyable and entertaining short videos explaining concepts in the Bible and how it all fits together. According to The Bible Project, “This is episode 1 of a 14-part series that explores the origins, content, and purpose of the Bible. Here you’ll be introduced to some of the basic skills necessary for reading the Bible effectively.”

 

 

 

 

Video Transcript

0:01
The Bible: it’s one of the most influential books in human history.
0:05
It explores the big questions of why we exist.
0:08
It’s inspired many people to do amazing things, and… confused many others.
0:13
And you’ve probably got one, sitting around… somewhere.
0:17
So. What is the Bible actually?
0:20
Well, the Bible is a small library of books, that all emerged out of the history of the people of ancient Israel.
0:26
And in one sense, they were just like any other ancient civilization.
0:30
But among them were a long line of individuals called prophets,
0:33
and they viewed Israel’s story as anything but ordinary.
0:37
They saw it as a central part of what God was doing for all humanity.
0:42
And, these prophets, were literary geniuses.
0:45
Really?
0:46
Yeah, they expertly crafted the Hebrew language to write epic narratives,
0:50
very sophisticated poetry, they were masters of metaphor, and storytelling,
0:54
and they leveraged all this to explore life’s most complicated questions
0:58
about death, and life, and the human struggle.
1:01
So, there’s a lot of different authors writing this book.
1:04
Yeah and these texts were produced over a thousand year period,
1:08
starting with Israel’s origins in Egypt.
1:10
Then leading up to their kingdom, with their first temple.
1:13
But eventually they were conquered by the Babylonians, who took them away into exile.
1:18
Then, at a crucial moment in their history, many Israelites returned to their land.
1:23
They built a second temple, they reformed their identity, and
1:26
this is when the Jewish Scriptures begin to be formed
1:28
into the shape that we have them today.
1:30
Okay, the Jewish Bible… what’s in it?
1:32
Well in Hebrew, it’s called by an acronym: Tanakh.
1:35
The “T” stands for “Torah.” (Sometimes called “the law.”) That’s Israel’s five-book foundation story.
1:41
The “N” stands for “Nevi’im,” the Hebrew word for “prophets,”
1:44
and this section consists of the historical books
1:47
that tell Israel’s story from the prophets’ point of view,
1:50
then you get the poetic books of the prophets themselves.
1:53
The “K” stands for “Ketuvim” – the Hebrew word for “writings.”
1:56
This is a diverse collection of
1:58
of poetic books, wisdom books, and more narrative.
2:01
And the Jewish people believe that through all of these literary works,
2:05
God speaks to His people.
2:08
Now, there are other Jewish writings being produced
2:10
during this Second Temple period as well.
2:12
Yeah, a really diverse group texts, and these too were
2:15
highly valued in Jewish communities.
2:18
And there was debate from ancient times,
2:20
about whether or not some of these should be considered part of their scriptures.
2:24
So… this is a lot of different writings, over a long period of time…
2:27
Why did they put them all together like this?
2:29
Well all together, these texts tell an epic story,
2:32
about how God is working through these people to bring
2:34
order and beauty out of the chaos of our world.
2:38
And it all builds up to a hope for a new leader who would come, and renew all creation…
2:43
And then the Tanakh concludes… and this leader never comes!
2:46
So it’s an expertly crafted work but it’s missing an ending?
2:50
That’s exactly right.
2:51
Now, few centuries later, a Jewish prophet comes onto the scene, named Jesus of Nazareth.
2:57
He claimed he was carrying the Tanakh story forward.
3:01
Yeah so Jesus, did a bunch of cool stuff… was killed…
3:04
But his followers claimed he was alive from the dead.
3:07
Yeah, they said that Jesus was that long-awaited leader who would restore the world.
3:12
And so his earliest followers called “Apostles,” they compose new literary works about the story of Jesus,
3:18
(they called these “good news,” or “the Gospel”), they formed an account, called “Acts,”
3:22
about the spread of the Jesus Movement outside of Israel,
3:25
and then they circulated letters to different Jesus communities all around the ancient world.
3:29
And they saw these writings as part of the scripture.
3:32
Yeah, the Apostles wrote all of this is fulfillment of that epic story found in the Tanakh.
3:37
And they were continuing the literary genius of the Jewish tradition.
3:40
They also believed that God was speaking to His people through
3:44
these texts, alongside the scriptures of Israel.
3:47
So that’s the Old & New Testament,
3:49
but what did the early Christians think of the other Second Temple literature?
3:52
Well different groups had different views about some of these books.
3:55
But we know they read them and
3:56
valued these texts, because they pass
3:58
them along with the Jewish Scriptures.
4:01
Okay, so we’ve got the Tanakh, (the Jewish scriptures),
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we got these other Second Temple period works,
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then the writing of the Apostles about Jesus.
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And that’s a lot of literature… so what’s in my Bible?
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So the Christian movement has taken different forms over 2,000 years, and from the beginning,
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all Christians recognized the Tanakh and the New Testament as scripture.
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And for centuries, much of the Second Temple literature was read that part of the biblical tradition.
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The Catholic Church eventually made it official,
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and called some of the books from this collection the “deuterocanonical books.”
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Some Orthodox churches used even more books from the Second Temple literature,
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and then in the 1500’s, during the Reformation,
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Protestant Christians wanted to go back to the oldest writings of the prophets and Apostles,
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so they accepted only the Old & New Testaments.
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Okay. I think I got it.
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But… how does a collection of books produced over a thousand years,
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by all these different authors, tell one unified story?
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Yeah, that’s the question we’ll address in our next video.
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Hey I’m Jon, and I’m Tim!
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This is The Bible Project, we believe the Bible is a unified story that leads to Jesus,
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and has profound wisdom for the modern world.
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So we’re creating videos to show that!
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This was the first in a brand new series, that we’re starting,
5:17
“How to Read the Bible,”
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But we have lots of other kinds of videos.
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And you can find it all for free on our website, at jointhebibleproject.com.
5:25
In fact, there you can find a handout that will accompany this video; just goes into more detail
5:29
on the information that is video is about,
5:32
and… lots of other resources. So check it out,
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and you can also be a part of this by supporting us at thebibleproject.com.
5:39
Our goal is to make all these resources available for free, to anybody, anywhere,
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and we can do that because of your support.
5:45
So thanks so much you guys. Thanks.