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My Bipolar Disorder Fuels My Passion for Writing #WorldBipolarDay

By in Noah's Archives | 0 comments

Having bipolar disorder can seem like a blessing and a curse. It can play havoc on your moods, energy, and relationships but it also provides tons of creative energy. In my case, I direct that energy into writing. And, increasingly, I find myself expanding into expressing my creativity through drawing and artwork. I’m the author of 24 books. The writing process involves both left and right brain tasks. This is convenient since depression puts me in a logical, left-brained state of mind for long periods and mania puts me in an energetic, creative, right-brained state of mind for long periods. The creative right brain comes up with ideas—too many for me to ever complete. It generates the major concepts, figures out how they relate, and gets the first draft on paper in short order. The logical left brain is the inner editor, constantly critiquing and evaluating so when I am depressed...

Bipolar Happens by Julie Fast (@JulieBipolar)

By in Book Reviews, Mental Health | 0 comments

Julie Fast’s book, Bipolar Happens: 35 Tips and Tricks to Manage Bipolar Disorder, is a quick read, but a thought-provoking one. She covers 35 problems people with bipolar face and describes not only her debilitating problems but her own tried and proven coping strategies. She covers everything from the fear of going to public events to bipolar spending sprees and more. For each problem area, she frequently offers a list of possible solutions. I had to pause to consider which problems I experience and which types of solutions could work for me. On one level there’s nothing earth shattering here. On another level, this small eBook does address a variety of concerns for people with bipolar disorder (and those who love them). One of the things I liked about her writing was her quirky and memorable analogies: The past is not a frog for you to dissect. Life is not a biology class....

Bipolar Dysphoria for the Holidays

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Because I have bipolar disorder, I occasionally go through cycles where I have a difficult time getting along with people. It’s called dysphoria. In my mind, I’m completely right and the other person is wrong. I don’t realize I’m doing anything wrong. Sometimes I can see it afterwards, but sometimes I still can’t see what I did wrong. All I know is there’s a trail of carnage in wrecked relationships and lost jobs. God is reminding me of something I already know to be true but somehow I forget it when I’m in a dysphoric state: Sometimes I can do or say the right thing with the wrong attitude. *Headslap* Well, duh. How could I not know that? Yet when I’m in a dysphoric state, I can’t see that.     Now that I’ve used up all my friends, I’m letting God do a little soul-surgery. I’m giving God permission to do whatever work He needs to do in my life to fix things. I’m very much aware that...

At the Corner of Mania and Depression

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From the middle of August to the middle of September, I was in a blissful state of mania. I needed very little sleep and was happy, energetic, and productive. I cranked out one writing project after another because mania produces a high level of creativity. I understand how drug addicts feel because I crave this state when I’m not in it. I grieve its absence and pray God will let mania come again soon. Since my manic state, I’ve had a bumpy ride. The transition out of a major mania or depression can be a lot like high-speed chase on a road with potholes—you get jerked around out of control and risk a blowout. It’s an unstable transition causing micro-moods, which are short-lived periods of depression, mania, and dysphoria. Dysphoria is the opposite of euphoria. Whereas mania is a high-energy euphoric state, dysphoria is a high-energy agitated state. I have a difficult time identifying...

Am I Broken beyond All Usefulness? Making Peace with Imperfection

By in Crazy Grace Blog | 0 comments

In the past few months I have experienced God’s healing in so many ways. I learned to take every thought captive and bring them to Christ, which greatly improved my outlook on life. I thought my bipolar ups and downs were a thing of the past. I even dared to say God had healed me of the effects of bipolar disorder. And I planned to start a new ministry in January to help people with bipolar disorder and to help others understand bipolar disorder. I felt qualified to do this because I had come so far with God’s help. The week before Thanksgiving, I got sick and wasn’t able to take my medication for three days. I went into a manic high followed immediately by an angry-depressed rage. Because of the public nature of my crisis, I withdrew for the past several weeks to nurse my physical and emotional self. Not only was I mortified by the way people saw me act, but I was heartbroken that my...