Troubled Minds by Amy Simpson (@aresimpson)

Jan 23

Troubled Minds by Amy Simpson (@aresimpson)

During Amy Simpson’s youth, her mother developed schizophrenia. She knows firsthand the traumas and difficulties of families with mental illness. That’s why she writes with such passion and compassion for others who struggle with mental health problems. In particular, she points out the many ways the church has failed people with mental health issues.

In her book, Troubled Minds: Mental Illness and the Church’s Mission, Simpson addresses the practical and theological issues that feed misunderstanding about mental illness in church communities. But she doesn’t leave her message at “do better,” she goes on to share the success stories of churches who intentionally reach out to people through mental health ministries. She describes specific actions the church or individuals can take to help people who experience a mental health crisis. And she offers her vision for the future, in which the church becomes a safe place for broken people.

Troubled Minds should be mandatory reading for every seminary student and pastor. It is a much-needed book in today’s church. Amy Simpson offers the wisdom that comes from experience to shed light on the darkness within the church.

Here is a quote from Troubled Minds:

As we’re busy enthusiastically delivering meals to suffering people, we are largely ignoring the afflictions of 25 percent of our population. That’s about equal to the total percentage of people diagnosed with cancer each year, those living with heart disease, those infected with HIV and AIDS and those afflicted with diabetes—combined. No wonder several people I talked with called mental illness the “no casserole illness.” In contrast to the care we provide for others, we have very little patience with those whose diseases happen to attack their minds. And many people suffer in silence.

Amy Simpson, Troubled Minds: Mental Illness and the Church’s Mission


Troubled Minds

Mental Illness and the Church’s Mission

Amy Simpson (@aresimpson)

2013

225 pages

 


 

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